Business

A change in job (and shirt)

Perhaps a haircut, some laced shoes, and without the beer, is a better option for a job interview.
Perhaps a haircut, some laced shoes, and without the beer, is a better option for a job interview. Georja Ryan

THERE is a time and place for a flanny (coupled with some body odour), but it's definitely not the interview room.

Every day employers are astonished by the varying walks of life that stroll, and sometimes drunkenly stumble, through their doors to apply for a job.

So, when is that spaghetti-stained T-shirt just a few days past its wash date?

One Warwick business manager suggested if you had to question the cleanliness or appropriateness of your interview attire, it was probably worth changing your view.

"Poor presentation and hygiene are a few basic ones," he said.

"We realise some people come straight from a worksite to an interview and sometimes we can forgive that but, for the people who haven't, there isn't much of an excuse."

It's not just one's presentation that can prevent an employer hiring you.

The way you communicate, and what information you choose to divulge, can also land you in strife.

"You see them at both ends of the scale. Some say very little and you have to drag the information out of them, or some volunteer too much information," the manager said.

He said bad-mouthing past employers was also a no-no, as it showed immaturity and unprofessionalism.

Compulsive foot-tappers be warned: fidgeting also made it onto the top What Not To Do in a Job Interview list, with this one a pet hate among many employers.

"It shows they haven't got time to be there and makes you feel as though you're taking up their time," the manager said.

If you're guilty of any of them, it may be time to change your game plan. While you're at it, consider the following tips from MyCareer.com.

"The first 30 seconds count. Whether it's a date or a job interview, our brains make snap judgments about people within seconds of meeting them, and it starts before they even open their mouths," Lisa McLeod writes.

The handy jobs website states open body language and smiling are also key components to nailing an interview.

"Before you walk in the door take a minute to take a deep breath, relax your shoulders and straighten your posture.

"If you walk into the room with open body language you'll come across as confident and relaxed."

MyCareer suggests being enthusiastic about your interview, but don't suck up.

Authenticity is also key.

So next time you slap on a flannelette shirt for a job interview, or turn up with no idea of the job at hand, take a second to consider your other options.

Remember, first impressions last.

Topics:  business, employees, managers, warwick




FOOTAGE: Man arrested over high speed getaway

Alleged stolen car speeds through Warwick

Man arrested over police chase.

Woolworths job cuts: The man behind the 'rebuild'

THE man driving major changes at Woolworth, Brad Banducci, has a huge job ahead of him.

Brad Banducci has big job ahead of him after $1 billion loss

Kindergarten kids out and about for Jumpers and Jazz

The kids of St Mary's Kindergarten hit the streets of Warwick this morning.

Kids hit the street for Jumpers and Jazz.

Latest deals and offers

Robbie Williams and Ayda Field to expand family?

Robbie Williams and Ayda Field want more children.

Licking incident bars Ariana from performing at White House

Ariana Grande has been blocked from performing at the White House

Taylor Swift's ex throws support behind Kanye West

Calvin Harris shares a sing-along with Kanye West

Michael Jackson's jailed doctor wants his license back

Conrad Murray wants his medical licence back.

Pokemon Go: "Trading" on the horizon as game evolves

No Caption

Pokemon GO players will soon be able to trade with other trainers

Bindi Irwin: ‘I’ve lived 10 lives in one lifetime’

Bindi meets her fans.

SHE'S just turns 18 but Bindi's life has been full of experiences

You can own this Queensland town for just $1

Yelarbon

Unprecedented auction of town's business centre with no reserve

Work starts on $15M Caloundra apartment building

Turning the first sod at the Aqua View Apartments site in Kings Beach are (from left) husband-and-wife developers Alex Yuan and Stella Sun with construction company Tomkins director Mike Tomkins and Councillor Tim Dwyer.

Developers excited about addition to Kings Beach skyline

72-year-old Coast developer set to start new project

GREEN LIGHT: The Cosmopolitan has been approved for development at Cotton Tree.

Meet the Canberran set to deliver another chapter for Coast suburb

Plans revealed for 1500-lot 'master-planned community'

Precinct will be bounded by Boundary St and Shoesmith Rd

Ecco Ripley sales run sparks prime release

MOVING IN: Sekisui House has announced the release of more residential blocks at Ecco Ripley.

Sekisui House is preparing to unveil more land at Ecco Ripley

The climb is slow but property on the way up

Michael Matusik, director of Matusik Property Insights.Photo Allan Reinikka / The Morning Bulletin

The improvement would be mild when compared to past cycles