Rural

Farming a changing world

TRUE BLUE RURAL WOMAN: Nancy Hancock.
TRUE BLUE RURAL WOMAN: Nancy Hancock.

RURAL women might not be afraid to get their hands dirty and drive a tractor but it does not mean they do not enjoy the finer things in life as well.

Some of Warwick's most well-known rural woman gathered at Warwick's Gardens Galore last week to celebrate World Rural Women's Day with a decadent high tea.

Women are important and play a big role these days.

 

The aim of the day was to recognise the roles women play in enhancing agricultural and rural development.

Nancy Hancock, who has spent her whole life helping out on farms, said it was a great event.

"I have been a member of the Queensland Rural Women's Network almost since its inception," she said.

"I have owned a farming property in Killarney for a few years.

"My parents also owned a farm.

"My whole life has always involved working on a property."

Mrs Hancock agreed that women were vital to keep things running smoothly.

"Women are important and play a big role these days," she said.

"They help keep the property going."

Mrs Hancock would not go as far to say that women were more important than men on the farm.

"I think the roles complement each other," she said.

"Like teamwork."

The Killarney woman said women's roles in the industry have increased over the past three decades.

"Women have been educated over the last 30 years and are now able to keep up with all the new technologies," Mrs Hancock said.

When Mrs Hancock, who is now retired, worked on farms she had many roles including driving a tractor and drafting cattle in the yard.

"I enjoyed it," she said.

"I liked working with the cattle and seeing the young calves come along.

"Most woman on properties have to be involved, it is part of their lives."

During the high tea Mrs Hancock said herself and two others shared their knowledge and advice with the rest of the group.

"It was good to have the different age groups," she said.

"There was a younger woman who discussed the IT side of things, women who talked about the business side of things and myself as a retiree. It was a good mix."

Mrs Hancock did impart her favourite piece of advice onto the group.

"Be the agent of change, not the victim of change," she said.

Topics:  rural women, women in agriculture, women on the land




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