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Questions raised over Warwick girl's death

SUDDEN DEATH: Jazmyn Carter, (pictured above with her brother, Cory and mum, Jeanella) died from meningococcal sepsis last August, less than 24 hours after being admitted to Warwick Hospital with a headache and body aches. An inquest into her death is to be held in August.
SUDDEN DEATH: Jazmyn Carter, (pictured above with her brother, Cory and mum, Jeanella) died from meningococcal sepsis last August, less than 24 hours after being admitted to Warwick Hospital with a headache and body aches. An inquest into her death is to be held in August. Contributed

IT HAS been nine months since she was forced to farewell the girl who was not only her daughter but her best friend and Jeanella Carter is still tortured by the unknown.

Jazmyn Carter's mother doesn't know what happened the morning her beautiful daughter passed away in a hospital room.

She knows Jazmyn called for help at 1am and at 3.19am Jeanella answered a phone call that sent her world crashing down. Jazmyn was gone.

Jeanella is angry she was denied a chance to be with her daughter in her final moments.

"Why didn't they give me the chance to be with her and say goodbye to her, instead of letting her die alone with strangers?"

"I should have been told something was wrong. Nobody called me."

Yesterday the Warwick mother learned an inquest into her daughter's death - determined to be a result of meningococcal sepsis - is to be held in August.

She now hopes this would give her family some insight into the circumstances that occurred before her daughter's sudden death.

"She played AFL two days before she died - she had a bit of a cold but that was it," she said.

"The next day she came home with a headache and took some Panadol and went to lie down.

"Just after lunch she said she needed to go to hospital because her body was aching and her headache hadn't gone away."

Jeanella said she was frustrated her concerns about her daughter's condition weren't taken seriously at the Warwick Hospital.

"They looked at her and then said 'take her home' but I said 'No, she is going to stay here so you can watch her and I will be back tomorrow to get some answers on what is wrong'," she said.

"I just had a hunch - mother's intuition - and I knew she had to stay in hospital to be watched."

As she faces each day without her daughter, Jeanella said it is still hard to comprehend her daughter isn't coming home.

"I always think she is going to walk in the door and say 'What are you going on about, I'm right here'," she said.

Jazmyn's death devastated her family, including her dad, Rodney and siblings Cory, Tearna and Lameeka.

Jeanella said she would hold on to the happy memories of her daughter - and there are many.

"We were best friends and would talk about anything and everything," she said.

"Sometimes we would just look at each other and start laughing because we knew what the other was thinking, didn't have to say anything."

Although Rodney wasn't Jazmyn's biological father, he entered her life when she was six months old and it was instant love.

"She had him wrapped around her little finger the first day they met and did until the day she passed away," Jeanella said.

"She was daddy's little girl and was always in his truck and had to go everywhere with him. He used to have this doona he would take with him and if she saw him with it she would jump on it because she wanted to go with him."

Jazmyn's siblings were rocked by their big sister's death and Jeanella sees her late daughter when she looks at her son, Cory.

"They were twin souls - they were so alike and looked alike but were born two years apart," she said.

"Cory idolised Jazmyn - if she was being lazy she would ask him to go to the kitchen and get her a piece of cake and a drink, he would always do it.

"When they were young Jazmyn would dress him up in girl's clothes and when they were older they used to ride motorbikes together."

If she were here today, Jazmyn would be preparing to start her dream career.

"She had been accepted to go to Griffith University and was going to become a vet," Jeanella said.

"She loved animals and if she could save an animal she would take it home; kittens, field mice, anything."

Darling Downs Hospital and Health Services general manager rural Michael Bishop said DDHHS is fully co-operating with the coronial inquest, which is set for August 4.

"Part of the coronial inquest process is to help prevent similar deaths in the future, where that is possible," he said.

Topics:  coronial inquest darling downs hospital and health service editors picks jazmyn carter



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