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$10 A CAT'S SCALP: council offers pest bounty

FERAL MENACE: More than one million native Australian birds are killed every day across the country by cats, new research shows.
FERAL MENACE: More than one million native Australian birds are killed every day across the country by cats, new research shows. Mark Marathon

FERAL cats are now a hunted species after Banana Shire introduced a bounty on the pest.

The council will pay $10 for an adult cat's scalp and $5 for a kitten.

The bounty is designed to stop the growing population of feral cats in rural areas of the shire, where they are having a devastating effect on the native bird and mammal populations.

Do you think putting a bounty on feral cats is the right solution?

This poll ended on 20 October 2017.

Current Results

Yes, they are a pest and it should be more than $10

33%

Yes, $10 is a fair price

24%

No, there must be a better way

40%

I didn't care before, and I don't care now

0%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

The council has allocated $25,000 in its Land Protection budget to cover the cost of the bounty and will continue the program until this funding is exhausted.

Environment and planning manager Chris Welch said a similar program recently introduced in the McKinlay Shire had a significant impact on the feral cat population.

"An increase in feral cat numbers has been observed, particularly though the rural areas of the shire, and council has received information from the Upper Dawson branch of the Queensland Wildlife Preservation Society raising the issue of impacts from feral and uncontrolled cats," he said.

Mr Welch said the bounty would be restricted to feral animals destroyed on rural properties.

He said a property owner didn't need to be the party destroying the animal and requesting payment, but must sign the payment request form giving a hunter permission to be on their property.

"It is expected this will limit any potential for domestic pets to be caught up in the control program," Mr Welch said.

A recent study carried out by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub of the National Environmental Science Program found feral cats kill 316million birds every year, while pet cats kill 61million birds.

Lead researcher Professor John Woinarski said everybody knew cats killed birds, but this study showed the amount of predation was staggering at a national level.

"We found that the birds most likely to be killed by cats are medium-sized birds, birds that nest and feed on the ground, and birds that occur on islands or in woodlands, grassland and shrublands," he said.

"For Australian birds, cats are a long-standing, broadscale and deeply entrenched problem that needs to be tackled more effectively. "Our knowledge of the impacts of cats on threatened mammals was a major stimulus for our first-ever national Threatened Species Strategy, which prioritised actions to control feral cats."

Topics:  bounty cats editors picks feral cats pets



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