Allora Butchery’s Grant Lollback reckons he would eat horse meat if it was on offer.
Allora Butchery’s Grant Lollback reckons he would eat horse meat if it was on offer.

Horse may be on menu at butchers

MOST don’t baulk at devouring Daisy the cow, Skippy the kangaroo or Peter Rabbit, so would tucking into Mister Ed make you cringe?

A butcher in Western Australia was recently given the green light to serve horse meat for human consumption and has created uproar, with online petitions and protests flooding in.

It’s a first for Australia, and if there is a big demand for the meat, horse sangas and stews may soon be a possibility for the Sunshine State.

Allora Butchery owner Grant Lollback said he would not mind trying the dish - which celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay has served up in the past - if “cooked correctly”.

“I’m daring, I’d give it a go,” Mr Lollback said.

“But I don’t think I’d stock it, there’d have to be a fair few people asking for it for me to have it.”

Allora’s king of meat said his spread of offerings sometimes included the exotic.

“(Yesterday) morning a lady came in asking for venison and I’ve had a guy ask for buffalo but I couldn’t find any for him. If people ask for something, I try and get it in for them.”

While Southern Downs steeds can relax in the paddock – for now – the exportation of horse meat began in Australia in the 1970s.

The Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service data shows Japan was the greatest consumer of Aussie horse meat and from 2006 to 2007, 2320 tonnes of horse meat was exported to 14 countries with the total value of exports in 2006 to 2007 $10.3 million.

The Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture 2009 data shows there are about 1.2 million horses in Australia, including about 400,000 feral horses.

Horse meat generally comes from failed or retired sport horses and feral horses.

“Between 30,000 and 40,000 horses are processed for (overseas) human and (domestic) pet consumption annually,” the report states.

“Some horses are exported live for human consumption. Of the horses processed in Australia about 20 per cent are feral horses, mainly harvested from the northern regions of Australia.

“Horse meat for export must be processed in export-accredited abattoirs. Currently there are two abattoirs that are export-accredited, one in Queensland and one in South Australia.

“A (national residue) levy of $5 per head is imposed on the slaughter at an abattoir of horses intended for human consumption.”


Veronese horse meat stew

Ingredients: 1kg horse meat, cut from the rump, 2 sticks celery, 2-3 carrots, 1 large onion, 4 cloves, a dozen coriander seeds, 1 bay leaf, 1 clove garlic, 50g lard or porkback fat, 1/4 cup olive oil, 1 bottle full bodied, dry red wine, salt & pepper to taste, 1 tbsp butter kneaded in flour, paprika to taste.

Preparation: Lardoon the meat with the lard and slivers of carrots. Dice the other vegetables and put them with the meat and the spices except the paprika in a bowl; pour the wine over everything, cover and marinate in the refrigerator for three days, turning the meat occasionally. Pat the meat dry (reserve the vegetables and the marinade), flour it, and brown it in the oil, in a pot over a brisk flame. Add the vegetables, and after a few minutes, pour the marinade over the meat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about three hours. Once the meat is done, remove it to a platter and blend the sauce. Return the sauce to the fire, thicken it with the butter-flour ball, and season it to taste with paprika. Pour the sauce over the meat and serve. (Source: italianfood.about.com)



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