Farmer Peter Spencer will be in Warwick on Thursday to give a lecture.
Farmer Peter Spencer will be in Warwick on Thursday to give a lecture. AAP/Alan Porritt

Fight against vegetation laws

PETER Spencer’s fight against vegetation protection laws across the country has reached Warwick.

In January, Mr Spencer made national headlines when he went on a 52-day hunger strike in protest to the laws after a decade-long fight.

Mr Spencer will this Thursday night deliver a lecture upstairs at the Criterion Hotel after The Head Tower of Hope campaigner Laurie Dagg arranged the visit at the weekend.

Mr Spencer succeeded in getting a Senate Inquiry into the laws, which is still underway and is currently facing the full bench of the High Court in his case against the Commonwealth.

He yesterday spoke with the Daily News ahead of his visit later this week.

“This is not just a one-off, this is just another fight in the overall war to get our rights back,” he said.

The ACT property owner said his battle was definitely not a David and Goliath scenario and admitted he was surprised he lasted as long as he did without sustenance earlier this year.

“Look, I am surprised. I thought maybe 30 days or 32, but I was prepared,” he said.

“My thoughts didn’t go beyond the tower. I never planned this.

“I had to do it in a way that was passive, and in a place they couldn’t drag me down. Four times the police came and four times I said ‘You’re trespassing, get off’.”

The majority of the legal research which is undertaken for the several court cases Mr Spencer currently has on the go is largely undertaken by him and a small team of unpaid supporters.

Last week he was granted a hearing before the full bench of the High Court in his case against the Commonwealth.

Mr Spencer said he would not stop before this year’s federal election and said he would not turn down anyone across the country who wanted him to come speak.

“What we’re saying is if you want these rights back, you’ll have to get a firm bill of rights,” he said.

The main concern with the vegetation laws is it gives state governments across Australia the powers to take land from property owners without compensation to offset carbon emissions.

Mr Dagg said he hoped Mr Spencer would win his case against the Commonwealth, so as to set a precedent for future legal action.

“What the government is doing is taking your property off you by locking it up in vegetation laws to cover the greenhouse gas emissions,” Mr Dagg said.

“It’s happening to anybody that has a piece of dirt. We want those laws to be reversed; we’re not looking for compensation, we’re just looking for justice.

“This people power movement is getting bigger and bigger.”

Mr Spencer will speak at the Criterion Hotel on Thursday from 7pm and at St Joseph’s Hall in Stanthorpe on Friday from 7pm.

There is a $10 donation to attend.



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