WHEN Brandon and Ethan Hornby and Tyler Harvey went fishing at Chinamans Beach, Agnes Water, they didn't expect they'd be helping a massive tiger shark back into her home.

The fishermen felt something pulling on their line.
The fishermen felt something pulling on their line.

Mr Hornby said yesterday's encounter was a timely reminder that big sharks would be around with turtle season in full swing.

"Just a normal day with mates going for an afternoon fish when we come across this beautiful 10ft tiger shark," he said.

Brandon Hornby helped get this tiger shark back out to sea.
Brandon Hornby helped get this tiger shark back out to sea.

"Thanks to the locals that where at Chinamens at the time to help us carefully release this amazing shark back to her home."

Brandon Hornby helped get this tiger shark back out to sea.
Brandon Hornby helped get this tiger shark back out to sea.

Mr Hornby said the majestic creature had accidentally got her tail caught in the end of the fishing line, but the fishermen made sure she was safe.

Brandon Hornby helped get this tiger shark back out to sea.
Brandon Hornby helped get this tiger shark back out to sea.

"We've been fishing these waters for years and we have the correct gear to help ensure that when we do hook a large specimen such as this one, that the team works fast to get it back in the water," he said.

Brandon Hornby helped get this tiger shark back out to sea.
Brandon Hornby helped get this tiger shark back out to sea.

Mr Hornby said over time, he and his friends had caught a few big sharks and always gave them the same good treatment.

"I normally keep my distance from them when releasing, but this big girl I got right up close and she did flail around a bit but we where able to get either side of her and push her past the breaking waves," he said.

Brandon Hornby says all sharks get the same caring treatment.
Brandon Hornby says all sharks get the same caring treatment.

Tiger sharks are known to inhabit the waters off the region's coastlines.

Last year, a Griffith University study found a 71 per cent decline in their numbers across the Queensland coast.

Brandon Hornby says all sharks get the same caring treatment.
Brandon Hornby says all sharks get the same caring treatment.

Lead author of the study, Chris Brown, said more needed to be done to protect shark species.

"Tiger sharks are top predators that have few natural enemies, so the cause of the decline is likely overfishing," he said.

"This decline is surprising, because tiger sharks are one of the most resilient large shark species. Mothers can birth up to 70 pups every three years, which means the population should be resilient to moderate levels of fishing."



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