Aussie readers ‘recall printed word on paper better’

BRANDS communicating on paper are able to connect better with customers, new Australian research reveals.

A leading industry report, The Value of Paper and Print 2013-2014, shows that despite the increasing popularity of digital media, paper as a communications device remains the most effective channel when engaging with customers.

The research was carried out for print media advocacy group, Melbourne's TSA Ltd.

TSA's Kellie Northwood said research showed that regardless of whether print material was books, magazines, catalogues, leaflets, newspapers or even direct mail, information transference and recall were more effective on paper than on screen.

The key findings revealed that 20% of people remember an article better when reading on paper.

They also showed 7 in 10 Australians read magazines. That's 6.4 million men and 7.4 million women reading magazines each year.

They showed newspapers were read by more than 15 million Australians every month, or 86% of the population aged 14 and over.



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