Baby Emma was born in November, but her embryo was conceived in 1992. Picture: National Embryo Donation centre
Baby Emma was born in November, but her embryo was conceived in 1992. Picture: National Embryo Donation centre

Baby conceived in 1992 born

AN AMERICAN woman has given birth to a baby who was frozen as an embryo for more than 24 years, the longest known frozen human embryo to be born.

The US National Embryo Donation Center (NEDC) announced on Tuesday that Emma Wren was born on November 25 to Tina Gibson, 26, from Tennessee.

This means Gibson carried an embryo that was conceived about 18 months after she herself was born, a press release stated.

Baby Emma was cryopreserved in 1992 and placed in Tina's uterus through "frozen embryo transfer" earlier this year.

"Emma is such a sweet miracle," Benjamin Gibson, Tina's husband, said.

"I think she looks pretty perfect to have been frozen all those years ago."

Dr Jeffrey Kennan, NEDC's director, said he hoped Emma's story inspires others to donate their embryos to families in need.

"It is deeply moving and highly rewarding to see that embryos frozen 24.5 years ago using the old, early cryopreservation techniques of slow freezing on day one of development at the pronuclear stage can result in 100 per cent survival of the embryos with a 100 per cent continued proper development to the Day-3 embryo stage," said NEDC laboratory director, Carol Sommerfelt.

Emma weighed 2.9kg and was about 50.8cm long at birth, WND reported.

This article originally appeared on Fox News and has been republished here with permission.



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