Apexians (back, from left) Peter Hardwick, Neil Briscoe and Tim Gallagher with (front) Bush Childrens health support worker Linda Cholawinskyj and CEO Cheryl Miller.
Apexians (back, from left) Peter Hardwick, Neil Briscoe and Tim Gallagher with (front) Bush Childrens health support worker Linda Cholawinskyj and CEO Cheryl Miller.

Band performs for kids of the bush

CHILDREN throughout the district in need of allied health services will benefit from the support of all those who attended the jazz fundraiser with the Royal Australian Artillery Band, 1st Field Regiment at the Warwick Town Hall on Saturday night.

When the Jumpers and Jazz committee approached the Royal Queensland Bush Children's Health Scheme CEO Cheryl Miller and offered the use of the town hall to host an event during the festival to fundraise Mrs Miller was only too pleased to take advantage of the opportunity.

Mrs Miller said while the organisation received some funding from Queensland Health and the Department of Education it relied heavily on fundraising and donations to keep services available to the community.

“We are very fortunate that the Royal Australian Artillery Band chose us as their designated charity and performed at no charge,” she said.

“The band is fantastic.”

Mrs Miller said she was also extremely grateful to the Warwick Apex Club for their involvement.

Warwick Apex president Neil Briscoe said the club was honoured to assist with the event.

“Our members spent the day cooking up a storm to provide dinner for the band and we were happy to offer canteen facilities for guests during interval on Saturday night,” he said.

The Bush Kids scheme offers free health care to children from birth to 13 and provide services such as psychology, occupational therapy, speech pathology and family health support. The service is available to all with a referral from a medical or education professional.

Mrs Miller said the service addressed issues early.

“If we don't fix the problems when the children are young, their disabilities may affect their ability to learn which can in turn lead to the children turning to juvenile crime and, worst case scenario, even suicide,” she said.

“Brought up in the bush and having a physical disability myself I know how important it is for families to have access to allied health services in regional area.”



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