Volunteer Glen Tickle and Allora Show Society president Shirley Cornhill with a circa 1900 Swiftshore washing machine.
Volunteer Glen Tickle and Allora Show Society president Shirley Cornhill with a circa 1900 Swiftshore washing machine.

Bidders enticed by surprise items

TREASURE hunters may find more than they bargained for today at the Allora Community Auction held at the Allora Showgrounds.

The auction will commence at 8am with over 2000 items up for grabs.

The range of items available is wide and varied and includes bric-a-brac, furniture, antiques, tools and machinery.

Volunteer Glen Tickle said whether you have one dollar or thousands of dollars to spend there is something for everyone.

“Cooking utensils could go for as little as $1, while a block-splitter could bring up to $5000,” he said.

President of the Allora Show Society Shirley Cornhill said she is hoping for a record crowd this year.

“The auction always draws thousands of people from near and far,” she said.

Entry is free and canteen facilities are available supplying hot food and beverages.

There will be three separate bidding arenas in full swing all day.

Vendors have travelled from as far south as Grafton and as far north as Rockhampton this year.

Local vendor, Keith Mundey from Tannymorel has been coming to the auction for 15 years.

He has brought a number of items to the sale this year including cow bells, dingo-traps and grain grinders, but his pride and joy is the 1920 vintage spring cart which he restored himself.

“I have a passion for restoring horse-drawn carriages and giving new life to these old items,” he said.

“I really enjoy the auction each year, it’s sort of like the Big Day Out without the music,” he added with a chuckle.

Volunteer, and life member of the Allora Apex Club, Lyle Johnson said there is no one particular item that attracts the crowd.

“It is the unknown which I consider to be the main attraction because you never know what you’ll find once you get here,” he said.

Mr Johnson said a feature of the day would be seeing auctioneer Jim Leeson in action.

“Mr Leeson is some 90 years old with the energy of people only half his age and he has been an auctioneer at the Allora Auction since it began in 1975 when it was known as the White Elephant Auction,” he said.

Mrs Cornhill said the auction, which has been 12 months in the making, would not be possible without the support of the community.

“I would like to thank the 200 volunteers who make the event a reality,” she said. “We are hoping to raise $25,000 at today’s auction which will then be injected back into the community.”



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