FIGHT BACK ONL Jake Wyllie (centre) will fight at Smithy’s TGW Gym on July 11 - his first professional fight.
FIGHT BACK ONL Jake Wyllie (centre) will fight at Smithy’s TGW Gym on July 11 - his first professional fight.

Boxer punches through adversity to get career start

BOXING: The stage has been set and a date decided for Warwick boxer Jake Wyllie to take to the ring in his professional debut.

The 20-year-old will fight on the undercard of Steven Spark and Mick Whitehead on July 11 – a fight that will be attended by limited spectators however will be broadcast around the world.

Wise beyond his years, Wyllie will use the motivation of tight coronavirus restrictions to spur him on during the fight.

“It’s going to be different – I’ve not fought in front of a limited number of people,” Wyllie said.

“It’s adapting to different times and I know what I’m in there for.

“People can’t fight for me.”

The extra nine weeks has given Wyllie and trainer Damian Lawler more time to prepare for the fight, continuing to develop and work on fitness and skills.

“I haven’t been able to spar at all, so leading into this fight it’s been different not to have those rounds in place,” Wyllie said.

“But the replacement of sparring has just been with a lot of boxing pads; doing 12 to 15 three-minute rounds on the pads per day.

“It’s the same sort of thing with the hand eye-coordination and footwork but you just don’t get the punch.”

Wyllie credits his “tight night” team for keeping him motivated through the boxing hiatus, with no pressures or responsibilities falling on the young boxer.

With a little over five weeks until Wyllie’s debut, an opposition is yet to be locked down for the fight.

“I still don’t have an opponent which is stressful for us all,” he said.

“We’ve been trying for over 10 weeks. We didn’t have anyone booked in for May 9 and no one has offered at this stage.

“My first fight not be in Toowoomba at this stage, it might have to be in Brisbane or the Gold Coast.”

While virus restrictions begin to ease, the time out of the ring has reconfirmed Wyllie’s love for the sport.

“It’s sort of a good thing because when you get to climb the ranks and more opportunities happen, not everything goes your way,” he said.

“It has helped me because maybe not everything will go to plan all the time.

“When I do make a statement, it will be bigger and better.”



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