CAKE-CUTTING CEREMONY: QCWA state president Robyn McFarlane, Florence Slattery, Warwick branch president Judy Bilbrough and Gene Shelley cut the cake.
CAKE-CUTTING CEREMONY: QCWA state president Robyn McFarlane, Florence Slattery, Warwick branch president Judy Bilbrough and Gene Shelley cut the cake. Kirstin Payne

QCWA branch marks its 90th birthday

FAMOUS district wide for their hospitality, the QCWA tearooms were a hive of activity at the weekend as the Warwick Condamine Branch celebrated its 90th birthday.

Members from across the south-east corner of the state gathered to celebrate this milestone.

To one of the branch's longest serving members, Lillian Wright, the years of hard work are all worth it.

"I've been part of the CWA for as long as I can remember," she said.

Lilian was even part of the original group which helped build the tea rooms.

Mrs Wright described how the Warwick branch raised enough money for the complex one lamington at a time.

"It was mainly catering we made our money from - so much fruit salad and baked potatoes," she said.

However she joked about how she was once left with a boiler full of potatoes when an event was rained out.

"I had no idea what do with all of them," she laughed.

The QCWA choir entertains the guests at the celebrations at the weekend.
The QCWA choir entertains the guests at the celebrations at the weekend.

 

After the tea rooms were established the branch continued its fundraising endeavours.

The group now contributes a minimum of $30,000 a year to a multitude of charities.

These include CareFlight, Angel Flight and the Leukaemia Foundation. There is also a huge focus on drought relief.

"We work very hard for it," branch vice-president June Sawyer said.

Although the organisation does have an increasingly aging population sparks of young energy continue to find their way in.

These include the QCWA's newest branch, the Fireflies, who aim to follow in the organisation's charitable legacy.

Whatever the changes, for many the QCWA will always feel like home.

"I'd be lost without it. I'd hate to sit at home and vegetate," branch president Judy Bilbrough said.

"It's a place where you can come in and people call you by name. You feel as though you are really part of something."

Penny Campbell-Wilson, Southern Downs Mayor Peter Blundell and QCWA Border Division president Joyce Bell.
Penny Campbell-Wilson, Southern Downs Mayor Peter Blundell and QCWA Border Division president Joyce Bell.


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