A Brisbane father, 48, allegedly abused his son, posted photos of the abuse on the internet and pimped the young boy out to sex tourists. Picture: iStock
A Brisbane father, 48, allegedly abused his son, posted photos of the abuse on the internet and pimped the young boy out to sex tourists. Picture: iStock

Dad allegedly pimped out child to sex tourists

A BRISBANE father allegedly pimped out his little boy to child sex tourists in a shocking case that will be used in a ramped-up fight against Facebook and other tech giants.

Law enforcement agencies will on Wednesday declare "legislation (is) lagging behind technology" and obstructing their ability to stop child sexual abuse amid an increase of exploitation for financial gain.

Facebook, Google and other tech giants are planning to "go dark", meaning they will move their platforms to offer end-to-end encryption, eroding the ability of police to hunt down predators on their networks.

End-to-end encryption technology only allows the person who sends the content and the person they are sending it to see what has been sent.

The Courier-Mail can today exclusively reveal the despicable alleged acts against the three-year-old boy from Brisbane, whose father was arrested in December last year.

The Australian Centre to Counter Child Exploitation (ACCCE) in December received an urgent referral relating to a child at risk by an online user within an encrypted platform.

Queensland Police allege the Brisbane man, 48, had engaged in sexual acts with his son, photographed the abuse and posted it online, encouraging others to molest his son.

It is alleged that the man was advertising his son to child sex tourists from across the world who were willing to travel to Australia to abuse the three-year-old and then post the abuse material online for others to view.

AFP Commissioner Reece Kershaw (front) will front the National Press Club in Canberra alongside other law enforcement officials to plead the case for new legislation to counter online child sex abuse. Picture: Kym Smith
AFP Commissioner Reece Kershaw (front) will front the National Press Club in Canberra alongside other law enforcement officials to plead the case for new legislation to counter online child sex abuse. Picture: Kym Smith

The man, whose two children have been removed from his care, was allegedly part of a broader child sex offender network operating on Telegram, engaging with other child sex offenders across multiple countries.

Evidence provided by ACCCE and working with international partners, has led to arrests in the US and UK.

Five children have been removed from harm to date.

Some encrypted messages can be decoded and the Morrison Government last year passed the Assistance and Access Act, which can force tech companies to decrypt communication or build a new function to expose a suspect's data.

But end-to-end encryption makes it significantly harder for law enforcement to access the content of messages.

If the alleged Brisbane father had used end-to-end encryption, for example, he may have not been identified or charged.

AFP Commissioner Reece Kershaw, Australian Criminal Intelligence chief executive officer Mike Phelan and AUSTRAC chief executive officer Nicole Rose will address the National Press Club in Canberra on Wednesday on the worrying trends in child exploitation.

Ms Rose will reveal, "one of our greatest challenges is the advancement of communications technology without corresponding legislation to close gaps for criminal exploitation".



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