Condamine River water through the United Service Station and across Madsen Bridge just before dark on Monday January 28.
Condamine River water through the United Service Station and across Madsen Bridge just before dark on Monday January 28. Gerard Walsh

Council dispels the rumour of a second flood

THERE is more rain predicted for Warwick today and over the weekend but the council has quashed talk of a second wave of floods.

"Southern Downs Regional Council would like to dispel the rumours that have been circulating the town that the river is expected to flood again this weekend," a council spokeswoman said.

"We would like to reassure residents and visitors that while a chance of thunderstorms has been predicted for (yesterday) afternoon and (today), the Condamine River and its tributaries have continued to fall since the flooding on Sunday and Monday."

The council's Disaster Management co-ordinator Jessica Pile continues to monitor the situation.

"Council has not received any information from the Bureau of Meteorology to indicate our rivers are at an increased risk of major flooding over the weekend," she said.

 

Southern Downs manager of works Eric Kraak said damage bills and an impact assessment for the Australia Day weekend floods on the Southern Downs region were yet to be carried out.

 

"The 2010/11 Natural Disaster Event damage was $56 million," he said.

"It is too early to estimate the damage (of this flood event). It will be less than the 2010/2011 event.

"Damage is primarily in the Dalrymple, Glengallan, Swan and Emu creeks and Condamine River catchments. There has been significant damage in the eastern parts of the ranges and significant damage on the flood plain further down."

Mr Kraak said the council would be reapplying for funding for numerous roads across the region.

"Emergency works have begun immediately. Submissions will have to be prepared for restoration works and we hope to have these completed within four to five months," he said. "We have two years to complete the works."

 

Meanwhile, Allora may be able to lower its damage bill in the event of another flood after the completion of its new flood warning alert system - a few days too late.

 

The $142,598 system features four stations across Campbells Gully, Canal Creek, Dalrymple Creek and Upper Dalrymple Creek.

Each station consists of a raised 3m platform with spring-loaded access gates and a 3m rain tree. The antenna, solar panel and rain gauge are all mounted on the top of the enclosures.

Mayor Peter Blundell said the stations were now operational.

"The data provided by the new Flood Warning ALERT stations will increase council's ability to communicate to the community the rainfall data and probability of potential flooding in these areas," he said.

"Given the flooding we have experienced in the last few days, early warning of potential flooding will be extremely helpful in terms of making appropriate preparations."

The new stations have now been included for data collection and display via the Bureau of Meteorology website.

The Daily News would like to hear from readers whether they think Warwick has appropriate warning systems in place for flooding. Call Erin on 4660 1364.



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