Country residents are furious that city-dwellers are reportedly driving in to strip their shelves of groceries.
Country residents are furious that city-dwellers are reportedly driving in to strip their shelves of groceries.

Country supermarket’s tough crackdown on shelf raiders

The Foodland supermarket in Naracoorte is asking shoppers for identification in a bid to secure supplies for its local customers.

There have been increasing reports of buyers flocking to regional areas across South Australia this week, leading to hardship for some rural families, particularly those on farms, who may only shop once a fortnight.

John Kilgour, the assistant manager of Carter's Retail Naracoorte Foodland, said the ID protocol came into place on Friday, after reports of interstate buyers travelling across the border in vans and buses attempting to load up on groceries in small country supermarkets.

"We've heard reports of people coming over to stores and stripping shelves of stock," he said.

"While we haven't seen that yet at our store, we wanted to ensure we had measures in place, if it was to happen."

Empty toilet paper shelves at the Coles supermarket in Adelaide. Picture: Kelly Barnes/AAP
Empty toilet paper shelves at the Coles supermarket in Adelaide. Picture: Kelly Barnes/AAP

 

A familiar site for many shoppers, both in cities and country towns.
A familiar site for many shoppers, both in cities and country towns.

Mr Kilgour said the main reason behind the ID decision was ensuring local shoppers weren't put at a disadvantage.

"We welcome anyone to shop here, every dollar counts, but this is to ensure we have plenty of stock holdings for our regular customers," he said.

"This is really a precautionary measure to protect our customers and to give everyone a fair chance to shop."

Mr Kilgour said, like most stores, the Foodland was also putting limits on in-demand items.

"It's at our own discretion. If we have a regular shopper who buys boxes of milk and lives at Lucindale, obviously we'll still cater for them, if we have the stock," he said.

"The first thing we noticed issues with was toilet paper and then it's progressed to long-life products, milk, pasta, rice, sugar - all of these items people are buying more than they normally would.

"We have plenty of food in this country, but it's just the supply chain trying to keep up with the high demand. It's all down to people being scared because we haven't had anything like this (coronavirus) for a long time."

 

Originally published as Country supermarket's tough crackdown on shelf raiders



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