REBUILDING after Cyclone Debbie and reviving the state's tourism sector will dominate the Budget, according to Treasurer Curtis Pitt.

Describing last month's tropical storm and its flooding aftermath as a "significant curveball" for Queensland's finances, Mr Pitt yesterday would not put a figure on property damage and the economic impact as assessments continued.

The repair bill will come on top of a probable hit to mining royalties due to lower production levels.

But Mr Pitt said Cyclone Debbie had not derailed his plan to post a surplus in mid-June.

"It is absolutely my intention to post a surplus," Mr Pitt said.

"Of course, we've been dealt the cards that we have, so we've got to work with those."


Mr Pitt said while the recovery would form a critical part of the Budget, job creation would also be a key.

Shadow treasurer Scott Emerson said without the expected boost to coal royalties, the Treasurer would be "up Pitt Creek without a paddle".

"The problem is, if it wasn't for those improved royalties, if it wasn't for the raids on public servants' superannuation, we'd be in real trouble now following a cyclone like Debbie," Mr Emerson said.

"You don't manage it (the Budget) on a hope, a wish and a prayer."

Meanwhile, Mr Pitt signalled possible help for homebuyers in regional areas.

Rejecting continuing calls to expand the first home buyers grant from new dwellings to ­established homes in regional areas, he said assistance for renovators could be looked at.

News Corp Australia


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