AGENT EVANS: Darryl Evans has watched the town change
AGENT EVANS: Darryl Evans has watched the town change Jonno Colfs

Darryl Evans calls a spade a tool

THINK what you like about Darryl Evans, the man is definitely one of Warwick's more colourful characters.

A shrewd business man, a council hopeful and opinionated observer, Mr Evans has no fear about speaking his mind.

"When I ran for mayor in 2012, I think I made my point," Mr Evans said.

"I printed 65,000 brochures explaining how the region couldn't afford the debt, couldn't afford WIRAC, couldn't afford the former CEO or the mayor or the four council directors.

"Now, the council is taking measures to reduce the debt, WIRAC has been privately leased, the CEO's salary was reviewed and we now have two directors instead of four.

"Not a bad result for losing an election."

Mr Evans finds it funny people thinks he is anti-council.

"Sure, I hold them to account, but that's our democratic right," he said.

"I think the new CEO is very proactive about bringing in new business, but the town has changed and business needs to change with it.

"The demographic is becoming loaded with welfare recipients and local business needs to cater to that market, which it currently isn't."

"I'm not anti-council. I've sold about $1million worth of council land for them in the past six months, as well as all the houses and small subdivisions that are all adding to the rates they collect, which will help reduce the debt."

Originally from the Gold Coast, Mr Evans moved to Warwick in 2005 after an illness scare.

"It was suspected I had stomach cancer, which was a major misdiagnosis but I was sick for quite a while and over-doing it on the work front. So the decision was made to take a step back and move away from the coast," he said.

"I had a computer business, a software development company and a security company and I sold them all and purchased a farm at Junabee and another at Freestone.

"It was so cheap I could afford to buy and still have money left."

According to Mr Evans, Warwick was a very different place in 2005.

"The main street was clean and free of litter, there was no graffiti, people gathered in the street and talked to each other, the town economy was strong," he said.

Mr Evans also has an opinion on the region's future.

"Cherrabah has approval for a 960-house development," he said.

"All the local trades, services and businesses would benefit, it's a golden opportunity for the area but it's being blocked because our council want the developers to upgrade of 18km of Cullendore Rd.

"They need to think of the rates, flow-on effects and benefits rather than stand in the way."



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