MORE VULNERABLE THAN EVER: Liz, Erin, Will, Finn and Nick Suduk have been more exposed to the public than before social distancing as stockpilers force them to frequently venture into town for essentials.
MORE VULNERABLE THAN EVER: Liz, Erin, Will, Finn and Nick Suduk have been more exposed to the public than before social distancing as stockpilers force them to frequently venture into town for essentials.

Disappointed farming families left vulnerable by stockpilers

IN the midst of a pandemic it may be more important than most for Nick and Liz Suduk to stay confined to their Conolly Dam Stud.

With an elderly mother in law and a five-year-old with breathing issues, Mr Suduk said he's constantly worried for the health of his family.

But as stockpiling has made their fortnightly shop virtually impossible, the family has been left more vulnerable as they ventured out into the public more frequently.

"We'd probably be really good at social distancing if we could buy the usual amount we do," Mr Suduk said.

"We've got three kids and it's a 20 minute drive into town so when we go we tend to try do all we need to do at once which makes a normal shop for us look like a hoard."

Unable to get the essentials in one go due to shortages and purchase restrictions, Mr Suduk has been forced to separate the household from his mother in law and keep his son Will from leaving at all.

"But if we're going to town and bringing it back, our little fella is likely to get sick regardless, then all bets are off," he said.

"We tried to do click and collect but that's stopped and it is quite worrying because people like us who are generally quite isolated from are now being even more exposed."

David Peters has felt the sting of stockpilers from his Talgai property with the nearest store constantly wiped of supplies.

"It doesn't take that long to get into town but there's only the IGA and it gets wiped clean," he said.

"It halts productivity and shouldn't be something you have to do when you've got tonnes of other things to be doing, it's pretty disappointing."

"For sure, it's making work hard, we spend three to four hours in town every few days now," Mr Suduk said.

"We aren't sleepy porch farmers and we've still got to get the work done.

"But it's the health of our family we're most concerned about and I think that's the case for a lot of the farming community."



Killarney marked for future council development

premium_icon Killarney marked for future council development

Residents reveal the changes they want to see in their picturesque town.

JOBS GALORE: 20 jobs available in Warwick today

premium_icon JOBS GALORE: 20 jobs available in Warwick today

Your next dream job could be just a click away. Don’t miss the chance for your next...

Break out the brollies, big rain predicted to hit Warwick

premium_icon Break out the brollies, big rain predicted to hit Warwick

Find out how much rain we could be dancing in over the coming week.