Warwick Police Sergeant Shane Reid has warned the community about the dangers of scam letters.
Warwick Police Sergeant Shane Reid has warned the community about the dangers of scam letters.

Police warn of latest scam

A FRESH scam is circulating the Rose City, with police advising against accepting offers which give people “false hope”.

A concerned resident passed a letter on to the Daily News this week from a Portugese financial institution promising 40 per cent of a deceased client’s $US32 million estate.

Warwick Police Sergeant Shane Reid said if money was deposited involving any scams, it could not be retrieved and the author is almost impossible to identify.

“Scam letters always offer false hope,” Sgt Reid said.

The objective of the scam is to procure your details and your money, without giving you what they promised in return.

It is important not to provide your personal details when receiving a suspicious offer, no matter whether it is in a written or electronic form.

“By responding to a scam email, you are automatically providing the scammer with your IP address, which can be used to hack into your computer and retrieve any personal information, including your banking details,” Sgt Reid said.

If a scam letter does provide you with your personal details, contact your bank to see how this information could have been accessed.

When a scam letter is received, it must be destroyed immediately to prevent any of your information getting back to the scammer.

If you have any questions, or if you receive a scam letter, forward it onto www.scamwatch.gov.au or call 1300 302 502 between 8.30am to 6.30pm Monday to Friday.

Yesterday police also advised the community to be extremely cautious when taking telephone calls from people claiming to be from consumer and government offices.

A number of incidents have been reported to police recently where scammers are calling residential addresses identifying themselves as a representative of a genuine banking institution or representatives of “bank reclaim expert” companies.

Detective Superintendent Brian Hay said the scammers called the victim to get them to recite their personal details and the banking institution they are with to give the impression they are from a genuine institution.

“These scams relate to the overpayment of tax and/or bank fees and offer a refund of these overpayments if the victim pays a fee, normally between $200 and $400,” Detective Superintendent Hay said.

“The public is reminded to not confirm personal identification details with the caller, but to report this type of scam to the appropriate authorities.”



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