SEEKING ANSWER: Bruce Scott and Peter Blundell in discussion about the deadly Eight Mile.
SEEKING ANSWER: Bruce Scott and Peter Blundell in discussion about the deadly Eight Mile.

Drivers still ignore stop sign at Eight Mile

WHAT will it take for drivers to take notice and stop at the Eight Mile intersection?

Three men standing at the corner in bright yellow vests clearly isn't enough.

Federal Member for Maranoa Bruce Scott met Mayor Peter Blundell, Deputy Mayor Ross Bartley, Cr Glyn Rees and Warwick and District Road Safety group members Graham Buchner, Andrew Gale and David Kemp at the Eight Mile yesterday morning to discuss concerns around the intersection.

Mr Scott said the Eight Mile was at the top of his list of priorities.

"I'm going to be putting on the pressure to get a design done for the intersection," Mr Scott said.

"I'll also be writing a formal letter requesting it be a top priority to eliminate the dangerous situation."

Cr Glyn Rees told Mr Scott of his first-hand experiences attending accidents as a fireman at the Eight Mile.

"You knew what to expect when you were heading to an accident at the Eight Mile and it wasn't good," Cr Rees said.

"I just know there are going to be more lives lost if something isn't done.

"There's no room for error, no room for indecision and it's everyone who pays the price," he said.

Cr Blundell stood firm telling Mr Scott the only solution was to separate the traffic.

"I'm concerned if initial measures are put in place, they may see it as a fix," Cr Blundell said.

"But we don't want a few more signs as a fix, we want the traffic separated.

"We need an overpass or a

roundabout."

Cr Bartley said the intersection was as much of a concern for locals as tourists.

"I know people in Allora who refuse to come to the intersection," he said.

"They go the back way to Warwick and completely avoid it."

Warwick and District Road Safety group secretary and AG Licensing owner Andrew Gale explained to Mr Scott some instances he saw of intersection crashes he investigated while he was in the police force.

"A lot of them came down to drivers not seeing vehicles in their blind spot," Mr Gale said.

"If a car or a truck is travelling at the same speed towards each other they can remain in the blind spot until impact.

"It's why stopping at a stop sign is so important."

All parties were in agreement that the design needed to be plain and simple.

"It's not just locals who need to understand it, it needs to be easier for travellers too," Cr Rees said.

After the conclusion of the discussion Cr Bartley, Mr Buchner and Mr Kemp decided to take a closer look at the intersection.

Mr Buchner said while they stood next to the stop sign at least 25 out of 30 cars rolled on through.

"It was shocking to see people go straight through the stop sign while we were right there," he said.

"You'd think a few blokes standing in vests would make you think you should stop.

"I'm absolutely gob-smacked; I don't know how to make people stop there if they won't do it while someone is standing there watching."



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