Dustin de Oliveira, Jak Kiepe, Nicholas Skeery and Mia Hurley working on their water skills at WIRAC on Monday.
Dustin de Oliveira, Jak Kiepe, Nicholas Skeery and Mia Hurley working on their water skills at WIRAC on Monday. Kerri Burns-Taylor

Encouraging our little water babies to learn swim skills

WATER is a huge part of the Aussie culture, whether it's fishing at the dam, riding the waves at the beach or enjoying a poolside barbie with a few good mates.

Now parents are being reminded of the importance of making sure their kids have the skills to not only be able to enjoy those activities but also to survive them.

WIRAC aquatic co-ordinator Karen Peters said more and more parents were opting out of school swimming lessons, which were the only times some kids learnt to swim.

"Numbers in school swimming has dropped and I believe that may be because of the cost of transportation to the school and because the government isn't offering enough funding," she said.

"And some families just can't afford it."

Mrs Peters said she considered it imperative that kids be given an opportunity to develop their water skills.

"In this country, where there is water everywhere, parents need to ensure their children know how to swim," she said.

"It helps with their physical and mental development and I don't see many kids who don't have a great time in the water."



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