FINAL RUN: Hynes Newsagency co-owners Peter and Paul Hynes making preparations for their final WDN deliveries this weekend. Picture: contributed
FINAL RUN: Hynes Newsagency co-owners Peter and Paul Hynes making preparations for their final WDN deliveries this weekend. Picture: contributed

“End of an era”: Newsagency prepares for final delivery

FOR almost 44 years, Hynes Newsagency has delivered copies of the Daily News to the doorsteps of loyal readers across the Warwick community.

However, as the paper makes the move to an all-digital format from next week, the local mainstay is preparing for a final busy week of stocking and delivering the WDN.

Hynes Newsagency co-owner Peter Hynes said the store had already been inundated with requests from Warwick residents keen to get their hands on Saturday's final printed edition.

"We should get a few extra papers for sure, because everyone will want a copy of the last paper for posterity or whatever," Mr Hynes said.

"We're still going to stock the papers that are in circulation, and we'll keep delivering all the mail-service ones for everyone out in the country, but no more in town.

"We've just got to the point now where the Daily News was about 95 per cent of our total deliveries, so it would just make it totally unviable for us to keep delivering papers."

First purchased by Val and Maurie Hynes in 1976, the newsagency has always been a family business, with Mr Hynes and his brother Paul taking over from their parents after they retired.

 

KEEPING IT IN THE FAMILY: Val, Peter, Maurie, and Paul Hynes with some of the final printed editions of the Daily News. Picture: Jessica Paul
KEEPING IT IN THE FAMILY: Val, Peter, Maurie, and Paul Hynes with some of the final printed editions of the Daily News. Picture: Jessica Paul

 

Mr Hynes said the abrupt end to more than 40 years of tradition had left many older readers "shattered" at losing the printed paper, and said the newsagents too would miss that community connection.

"One lady was actually in tears when I told her we weren't going to be doing delivery anymore, and she just asked what she was going to be able to do," he said.

"You have people who come in and pay for their papers each week, so you get used to seeing them regularly and having that personal service.

"It's the end of an era for us, really - you can't replace it exactly."

However, even as a defining era of the Hynes Newsagency draws to a close, Mr Hynes said their only option was to continue looking to the digitally driven future.

"Our last paper run won't be anything spectacular - it'll just be another day in paradise, living the dream," Mr Hynes joked.

"We'll keep trying to service all the people and we'll keep selling newspapers while they're still being printed, because you can't have a newsagency without any news.

"It's certainly pointing in the online direction though, and it's going to affect everybody."

To make sure you stay connected and up-to-date with community-driven news from local journalist, go to the subscription site or call Subscriber Services on 1300 361 604.



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