Zak Hudson, 10, travelled to Sandy Creek from Pittsworth at the weekend to compete at the karting championships. Photo: Kerri Burns-Taylor
Zak Hudson, 10, travelled to Sandy Creek from Pittsworth at the weekend to compete at the karting championships. Photo: Kerri Burns-Taylor

Enthusiasts converge for champs

THE fast-paced, rubber-burning action at the Sandy Creek Raceway at the weekend was not just reserved for adults, with kids as young as seven taking a seat for the adrenaline-pumping sport.

Fearless youngsters travelled from all over to compete in the Queensland Karting Championships, armed with hotted-up vehicles that were loaded with all the latest gadgets and gizmos.

Bayley Hall travelled all the way from the Gold Coast to compete in his fifth race meet and dad Roy Hall said it was great to have his son compete at such a prestigious event.

“This is V8 supercars at a Warwick level. It's amazing,” Mr Hall said.

“Bayley loves it and he gets over there and meets so many other kids – they have a great time.”

After any given race, Bayley and his father can sit back and review his performance thanks to a little camera perched on top of his vehicle.

“It's great because we can take him home and show him what he did right and what he can do better next time,” Mr Hall said.

Setting Bayley up with his speedy rig cost about $6000-$7000.

He usually takes to the track twice a week but Mr Hall said it was all about balance.

“It is quite an investment and we have a lot of family support here today but we still have a life outside of racing,” Mr Hall said.

Before his final race of the day on Saturday, Bayley was quite pleased with his performance during the day.

“One race today was awesome because I jumped 11 spots,” Bayley said.

“I'm actually getting faster. I used to do 54 seconds and now I'm doing 53.”

Fellow competitor Zak Hudson, 10, is in his second year of racing and trekked to the race meet from his hometown of Pittsworth.

He said he loves karting because it is a “fast motorsport”.

He was thrilled to conquer his pre-race nerves and move from 22nd place to 11th during a race on Saturday.

“Before big races I get nervous but when the lights go green the butterflies go away,” Zak said.

He said the love of the motorsport was in his blood and he has reached speeds of up to 95kmh.

“I got into it because my dad used to do it when he was younger,” Zak said.

“All of my friends think it's really cool and they want to get into it too.”



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