Queenslanders learnt more about Glengallan Homestead on the Channel 7 program The Great South East last night.
Queenslanders learnt more about Glengallan Homestead on the Channel 7 program The Great South East last night.

Exposure for icon of bygone era

IF WARWICK residents tuned into Channel 7 last night they would have seen a familiar sight.

Glengallan Homestead was featured on the television program The Great South East, beamed into households across southern Queensland.

Glengallan archivist Deirdre Llewellyn was at the homestead when The Great South East film crew headed to the historical site and filmed for most of the afternoon during Warwick's 150th celebrations in May.

Mrs Llewellyn said she hoped last night's episode would help boost the profile of Glengallan Homestead throughout Queensland.

“We are at a time when we have less and less of our heritage available,” she said.

“So places like Glengallan have to be looked after and kept as close to the original state as possible.

“We are losing too much of our history and we just can't afford to lose what we have.”

Mrs Llewellyn said the day the crew filmed, the homestead museum also received some valuable pieces to add to its collection.

“We had Queensland I Zingari (IZ) cricket gear presented to us,” she said.

“It was donated by Mrs Mary Feez in memory of the late Douglas Feez (also known as Ginger) who played for the IZ.

“It was the first active cricket club in Queensland and they played at the oval at Glengallan.”

She said the homestead was particularly special because it showed how people could fall from grace so quickly.

“To be able to build a place like Glengallan and then die virtually a pauper like John Deucher did,” she said.

Glengallan was started in 1867 and in its heyday was a successful and wealthy pastoral operation.

But as time went on, drought and a poor rural economy took its toll until it was eventually left abandoned.

It remained that way for 70 years and by the time the Glengallan Homestead Trust began restoration, it was essentially in ruins.

The homestead is run by volunteers who have spent years researching the history of Glengallan and the surrounding area.

Glengallan Homestead is open weekends and public holidays from 10am-4pm and weekdays by appointment. Adults – $10, Children – $4. For more information call 46673866.



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