GUILTY: Christos Panagakos, 25, attempted to sneak drugs into prison.
GUILTY: Christos Panagakos, 25, attempted to sneak drugs into prison. Facebook

'Extremely stupid': Bid to smuggle ice, valium into prison

A DRUG trafficker will spend no extra time behind bars for stashing ice and valium up his backside in an "extremely stupid" attempt at smuggling drugs into prison.

Christos Panagakos' scheme fell to pieces when drugs dropped from his buttocks during a search while en route to Capricornia Correctional Centre via Mackay Watch-house.

He'd been sentenced in the Supreme Court the same day, July 27, for trafficking ice and ecstasy, and had the drugs concealed during sentencing.

Panagakos received sentencing discounts during that hearing, after his lawyer submitted the budding personal trainer was "clean" and had broken free of the drug scene.

However, when Panagakos faced Mackay Magistrates Court via videolink from prison on Wednesday, he was sentenced to four months jail - to be served at the same time as his current term.

That means the parole eligibility date tacked on to Panagakos' three and a half year trafficking sentence remains unchanged: May 26, 2018.

Further, it was revealed Panagakos was busted after a similar stunt at Ipswich police station in July, 2015, when he smuggled in a bag of assorted drugs in his buttocks.

On Wednesday, the 25-year-old pleaded guilty to three counts of drug possession, one dated July 4, 2015 and two on July 27, 2017.

Prosecutor Bernhard Berger told Magistrate Mark Nolan that Panagakos has a lengthy criminal history and there was "obviously some aggravating features" surrounding his smuggling attempts.

"Both offences involve possession of substance while either being in custody or being taken to custody ... ," he said.

The prosecutor conceded there'd been a significant delay in charging Panagakos for the 2015 offence.

Later, defence solicitor Mark Williams, of Potts Lawyers, said Panagakos was "ashamed" about his decisions.

"He instructs the reason why he did what he did was simply to reduce his stress and anxiety about going to prison," he said.

"But he recognises that not only were his actions just extremely stupid, to use his words, but they were very contrary to the generous discounts that his honour Justice (James) Henry had given him in sentencing."

Panagakos read out a letter over video, in which he said he'd be seeking professional help: "Since being in custody I've had the opportunity to reflect on the nature of my offending behaviour," he said.

"What is apparent is that I use drugs to self medicate during stressful situations that I have difficulty coping with.

"I now realise this has been cowardly on my behalf and I'm simply running away from problems rather than dealing with them in a mature manner."

Panagakos said he was "truly sorry" and he'd had a "wake up call" after a "long hard look" at himself while in prison.

Mr Nolan took into account timely guilty pleas and Panagakos' efforts at rehabilitation while in custody, among other factors.



Asbestos scare spreads to primary school

Asbestos scare spreads to primary school

The number of children with possible exposure to asbestos grows

Hundreds of kids potentially exposed to footy-field asbestos

Hundreds of kids potentially exposed to footy-field asbestos...

Hundreds of children potentially exposed to asbestos over months.

SICKENED: 'Getting tackled, heads rubbed into the ground'

premium_icon SICKENED: 'Getting tackled, heads rubbed into the ground'

How Collegians found out soil was contaminated with asbestos.

Local Partners