HARD WORKERS: Daniel and Rachel Williams from Groovy Babies and Kidz Itemz with their daughter Billie-Rose, 6, at their warehouse on Alexandra Dve in Warwick.
HARD WORKERS: Daniel and Rachel Williams from Groovy Babies and Kidz Itemz with their daughter Billie-Rose, 6, at their warehouse on Alexandra Dve in Warwick. Elyse Wurm

Family overcomes horrific health scare to build big business

A TERRIFYING health battle befell Rachel and Daniel Williams three years into their new venture, when their three-year-old daughter suddenly struggled to walk.

But despite their turmoil they continued working to establish the business that now supports their young family.

The Warwick couple's daughter Billie-Rose was diagnosed with Guillain-Barré Syndrome at three years old, forcing her to learn to walk and swallow again.

Mrs Williams said the syndrome started like a flu, then Billie-Rose struggled to walk.

Billie-Rose was rushed to hospital in Toowoomba then flown to Brisbane, but it took doctors a week to diagnose her condition.

"I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy," Mrs Williams said.

Mr Williams said it was a scary time, as doctors watched closely as Billie-Rose ate.

"Seeing her have a drink and then realising she's choking, they had to limit it," he said.

But while in Brisbane, the couple drove back and forth to Warwick to pick up stock to fill orders for their business Groovy Babies and Kidz Itemz.

They were staying at Ronald McDonald House in Brisbane and carting boxes up the stairs, packing orders from the room.

Mr Williams said it was hard working while their daughter was unwell, but at the time it was their only source of income.

Around the same time, Mr Williams was also diagnosed with narcolepsy.

BOOMING TRADE: Rachel and Daniel Williams from Groovy Babies and Kidz Itemz have watched their flourish, gathering more than 90,000 likes on Facebook.
BOOMING TRADE: Rachel and Daniel Williams from Groovy Babies and Kidz Itemz have watched their flourish, gathering more than 90,000 likes on Facebook. Elyse Wurm

But the business was starting to take off, selling doona covers, blankets, and other goods featuring popular characters.

They were packing and sending between 20 and 30 orders a day.

Now the business is six years old, fielding 80 orders a day and has accumulated 90,000 likes on Facebook.

It started as a home business then filled a store on Grafton St and has now relocated to a warehouse at 17 Alexandra Drive.

Working through the fear of Billie-Rose's condition has paid off, as the business supports their family.

One of the most popular items for the business was created to help Billie-Rose, who is now six, during her recovery.

Mr Williams makes children's chairs using the character materials.

"We needed a chair for her to sit on that she could climb on and not fall off," Mrs Williams said.

Billie-Rose is now in Year 1 at Warwick West State School but still tires easily.

But Mrs Williams said running her own business allowed her to spend time with Billie-Rose and her four siblings.

Starting a home business has meant long hours and a bit of stress, but Mrs Williams said it's all been worth it.

"If you want it enough and you push yourself hard enough, you can accomplish anything, you've got to stay positive," she said.



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