Homicide Victims Support Group general manager Ross Thompson, who lost his son Michael in a brutal murder at Toowoomba, at the Homicide Awareness Day in Brisbane. The shoes represent those who have been murdered.
Homicide Victims Support Group general manager Ross Thompson, who lost his son Michael in a brutal murder at Toowoomba, at the Homicide Awareness Day in Brisbane. The shoes represent those who have been murdered. Rae Wilson

Father of murdered Toowoomba man wants to confront killer

THE father of a Toowoomba man savagely mutilated in his own flat has made a request for a one-on-one with the juvenile responsible to ask "why".

Ross Thompson's son Michael, 30, was one of three men brutally murdered in North Toowoomba almost eight years ago.

Sadistic killers, Scott Geoffrey Maygar, then 17, and then 16-year-old Brian John Woodman - the first juvenile offender publicly named in Queensland - are both serving terms of life imprisonment for the three murders and for raping a 19-year-old single mother who had also been at the flat that night.

The third offender was released in 2010 after serving half of his 10-year detention order but no-one will ever know who he is or where he is.

Mr Thompson said he knew where this third offender, now in his mid-20s, was living but he could not reveal the location.

"Our offender who has been released is now enjoying life out in the country," he said.

"I want to confront him on a one-to-one basis, away from everything and just talk to him.

"My main question is 'why did he go so far'.

"I understand the self-preservation thing but why did he go so far?"

The then 16-year-old, who had befriended Michael Thompson months earlier, claimed the other killers threatened him as well so he joined in to save his own life.

Far from simply joining in the beating, the teen had gouged Mr Thompson's eyes out with the claw of a hammer while he was still alive.

With the Thompson family's permission, The Chronicle made public the killer's use of the hammer to show what this individual was capable of when he was released in 2010.

When the then 21-year-old was released, Mr Thompson said he would end up in jail himself if he ever came across him in the street.

But he said on Thursday that he was now past the anger.

"My son Nathan is not, (my wife) Margaret is definitely not but I am," he said.

"That's why I want to talk to him.

"It's something that I think should be done. As a parent you want to confront those who stole your son's life."

Mr Thompson spoke to APN on Thursday at a Homicide Awareness Day in Brisbane.

He said working with other homicide victims, who were in the same situation, really helped him through.

Mr Thompson encouraged people to attend the Homicide Victims Support group meetings, not for counselling but to gain peer support.



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