Prime Minister Scott Morrison high fives the crowd as he heads to the dressing room to join the players following the Sharks win
Prime Minister Scott Morrison high fives the crowd as he heads to the dressing room to join the players following the Sharks win

PM reunites with Abbott in Labor seat

Scott Morrison is keen to channel Cronulla's come-from-behind NRL victory over Penrith by leading the coalition to an upset election win over Labor.

The prime minister jetted back to Sydney last night to see the Sharks overcome a 14-point deficit to bulldoze their way to a stunning 24-20 triumph.

A jubilant Mr Morrison crashed the Triple M broadcast post-match last night, chipping Panthers legend Mark Geyer about the result.

Geyer's fellow commentator Wendell Sailor gave Mr Morrison a dig, saying he hoped he didn't lose the election like Penrith coughed up their advantage.

"We're coming from behind like our boys tonight," the prime minister shot back.

Earlier, the Sharks' number one ticket holder busted a move in the stands, celebrating with some unorthodox dancing.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison with his wife Jenny in Sydney for the Good Friday Easter service at the St Charbel church in Punchbowl, Sydney. Picture Gary Ramage
Prime Minister Scott Morrison with his wife Jenny in Sydney for the Good Friday Easter service at the St Charbel church in Punchbowl, Sydney. Picture Gary Ramage

 

 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison celebrating as his team the Cronulla Sharks make a comeback against the Penrith Panthers at PointsBet Stadium. Picture: Jonathan Ng
Prime Minister Scott Morrison celebrating as his team the Cronulla Sharks make a comeback against the Penrith Panthers at PointsBet Stadium. Picture: Jonathan Ng

 

"I don't think Bill (Shorten) can move like that," Mr Morrison told the Nine Network.

Mr Morrison is attending the Good Friday Liturgy at St Charbel's this morning with about 5000 western Sydney locals.

The prime minister delivered a reading at the service at the Punchbowl Catholic Church in Labor frontbencher Tony Burke's seat of Watson.

Also attending the service was Tony Abbott, Immigration Minister David Coleman, NSW Liberal president Phillip Ruddock and the Liberal candidate for Reid Fiona Martin.

 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison and former Prime Minister Tony Abbott at the service. Picture Gary Ramage
Prime Minister Scott Morrison and former Prime Minister Tony Abbott at the service. Picture Gary Ramage


The prime minister had a solid first week on the trail but Labor remains a heavy favourite to win the May 18 election.

The Morrison campaign targeted marginal seats in NSW, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania after he called the poll last Thursday.

Both leaders have promised not to campaign today but they will still be out and about.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten visiting Bathurst Island apart of Tiwi Islands in the NT and attending a BBQ yesterday. Picture Kym Smith
Opposition Leader Bill Shorten visiting Bathurst Island apart of Tiwi Islands in the NT and attending a BBQ yesterday. Picture Kym Smith

Bill Shorten and wife Chloe headed to a Melbourne community cafe to serve food to the disadvantaged.

Both leaders have suspended their campaign for Good Friday, which means they are not holding press conferences and talking politics.

But Mr Shorten and his wife both served food at the Salvation Army's cafe in Melbourne's CBD, where they chatted to people about their experiences on the streets.

Trevor Wulf said he was on the streets for three and a half months after a gambling and alcohol addiction, but the Salvation Army brought him in and gave him accommodation.

He now works a as a volunteer cleaner at the food hall.

"I was sleeping in Fitzroy Gardens, the Salvos food van came along. I came here, got to know a lot of people heee, and ended up being a volunteer after a while," Mr Wulf said.

Asked about meeting Mr Shorten, he said: "He's all right... Politicians do the right thing until they get into power."

The downtime in the campaign comes as the ABC's Vote Compass has revealed 78 per cent think the decision to remove Malcolm Turnbull in August last year was the wrong call.

The data was compiled from 153,354 responses between April 10 and April 16.

The only group of voters who approved of Mr Turnbull being ousted were from One Nation, where 59 per cent approved of his removal and 41 per cent disapproved.

Mr Shorten has spent the first eight days of the federal election campaign looping around Australia, mainly visiting Liberal-held seats.

Mr Shorten had to weather a storm of attacks over his climate change and tax policies, after a bad press conference where he misunderstood one question and refused to answer another.



See photo gallery of many Pentath runners at Killarney today

premium_icon See photo gallery of many Pentath runners at Killarney today

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