James Carroll returns Cynthia Mayne’s wallet after she left it in her shopping trolley.
James Carroll returns Cynthia Mayne’s wallet after she left it in her shopping trolley. Shannon Newley

Good deed restores faith

WHEN Cynthia Mayne lost her purse after shopping for groceries at Rose City Shoppingworld, she didn't think she would ever see it again.

So she was surprised when she got a phone call from Warwick police saying it had been found in the shopping trolley she had used earlier in the evening.

She was even more surprised to learn the person who handed it in was the trolley boy – James Carroll.

“Maybe that's a reflection of me,” Ms Mayne said.

“But I really thought it would be an elderly person.”

Ms Mayne said she was just amazed that her purse had been returned with all of the cards and cash still in it.

“It's not just the money you lose, but it's having to replace all of those cards,” she said.

“It takes so much and time and costs a lot.”

Mrs Mayne said she first noticed Mr Carroll when she was entering the shopping centre with the first of his good deeds for the evening.

“He was in front of me with a line of trolleys and he stood back and let me pass him,” she said.

“Which I thought was really nice and polite.”

Ms Mayne said Mr Carroll's act of kindness had restored her faith in the younger generation.

“It's just nice to have something like this happen.

"We tend to hear so much doom and gloom and concentrate on all of those things,” she said.

“In fact I was telling someone else about it and he was saying his wife had left her purse in a trolley here as well,” she said.

“It also got returned to her, so they must have really good staff here.”

Mrs Mayne said the good deed meant she would definitely continue to buy her groceries at the shopping centre.

“I feel safe shopping at Rose City now,” she said.

Mr Carroll said it was the second time he had found a purse while going about his work, despite only being in the job for about two months.

He said it didn't even occur to him not to hand it in.

Rose City Shoppingworld marketing manager Stevie McGregor said customers were frequently leaving valuables behind in shopping trolleys.

“We get that a fair bit, whether it's wallets, mobile phones, or glasses,” she said.

“A lot of trolley boys run them back up to us, or pass them on to police or even straight back to the customers if they know them.

“They are really honest and we definitely value having them work here.”

She said it was a timely reminder for people to keep a close eye on their valuables but was reassured by having such reliable people working at the centre.

“It just goes to show there are still some really honest people out there,” Mrs McGregor said.



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