CEO wants solution to GrainX noise woes

LATE night road train deliveries, noise and dust are just a few of the complaints on the council meeting agenda today relating to the site of GrainX Australia in Allora.

GrainX CEO Chris Hood says he's been working closely with council to rectify issues.

In the report put to council today it details residents near the site at 20 Herbert St, Allora, being upset about the noise generated by truck and forklift movements, noise from grain moving through silo chutes, odour generated from the unloading of grain and traffic problems on South St.

Four different solutions have been recommended to council including a transitional environmental program, a direction notice for causing environmental harm, a fine for GrainX or for council to take no action.

"The best solution would be for council to put a transitional environmental program in place," Mr Hood told the Daily News.

"It essentially means I would have to work closely with council... which is what I am already doing.

"Over the past few months I've really been trying to rectify the issues some residents have."

"I've given some closer residents my phone number and have told them to call me when there's been issues."

Road trains truck grain in from properties to the Allora site where the grain is unloaded and tested, then the grain is tipped into shipping containers and trucked to the Port of Brisbane.

"I think most of the dramas are when the grain is being put into the shipping containers and they are being moved around," Mr Hood said.

"On a few occasions the trucks have been later coming out of Brisbane and loading around 9 to 10pm in Allora - occasionally there's some banging when we're trying to load the shipping containers, but we've bought a special forklift to help reduce the noise."

Mr Hood said he had been in contact with the logistics company in Brisbane.

"They know I need the trucks to be in Allora earlier," he said.

"But there's sometimes hold ups on the road and sometimes it doesn't go according to plan.

"And we do try and control the dust, we've got a water truck on site for the road dust and when it comes to the grain it just depends how fresh it is - if it's straight from the harvester there's more chance of there being some dust.

"But I really want to get these issues sorted, I'm not out to upset anyone."

Mr Hood said a majority of the grain going through the site was chickpeas.

"Once the chickpeas are taken to Brisbane they are shipped to places like India, Pakistan and Bangladesh."

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