Disappointed: Eunice and Bill Payne want their street’s grass mowed and kept tidy.
Disappointed: Eunice and Bill Payne want their street’s grass mowed and kept tidy.

Grass overtakes street

PRATTEN is a town with a remarkable history, from the boom days of the gold rush to today where residents feel forgotten.

Bill Payne was born in the peaceful town, and along with his wife Eunice is sick of begging for general maintenance to make the town presentable.

“We feel really neglected – we are just a forgotten area,” Mr Payne said.

The residents asked the Southern Downs Regional Council (SDRC) if it could mow their township streets a couple of months ago.

“They did a half job and didn’t do it neatly at all,” Mr Payne said.

“Then we rang and asked before Easter to see if they could come and tidy it up before Easter and they never came.

“I have said to the Mayor before, if they did the same job for him they would get the sack.”

The grass along White Street comes up to Mrs Payne’s waist.

She said they needed to have a councillor living in Pratten so they didn’t slip between the cracks and get forgotten about and “take a bit of pride in the outlying communities”.

They said they were disappointed that as rate-paying citizens the grass maintenance was overlooked and when it was done there was no pride in the work.

SDRC parks co-ordinator John Newley advised there was a contractor in place at Pratten to undertake slashing, who contracts to council and The Department of Transport and Main Roads.

“Council maintains the cemetery and the Pratten park, and the contractor looks after the roadside slashing,” Mr Newley said.

“We have been advised that the contractor will be out there about Wednesday of next week and he will mow the town as he goes through on his circuit.”

Mr Newley said the grass was high everywhere due to the current weather conditions, and where staff would normally get around to the town’s parks every three weeks it is currently taking longer.



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