Allora resident Matt Hagenbach eight months after the devastating hail storm that hit Allora.
Allora resident Matt Hagenbach eight months after the devastating hail storm that hit Allora.

Hail repairs still not finished

EIGHT months on, the effects of the hail storm last year are still at the forefront of Allora residents’ minds as roofs and cars are still being fixed.

Resident Matt Hagenbach’s roof is in the process of being fixed after the fierce storm hit the region in early November and damaged nearly every house in the town.

“It’s been a bit of a slow process - there has been a lot of roofs done, and that is just taking so long to do,” Mr Hagenbach said.

After the storm the Hagenbachs had no television reception and damage to window screens. They considered themselves lucky their cars escaped the hail.

“The roof is the last thing to be done now, our screens were fixed last week,” Mr Hagenbach said.

There are a lot of new shiny roofs covering the houses in the district, as just about every house in Allora was extremely damaged and have been revamped or waiting to be.

K J L Harrison owner Kevin Harrison has worked on roofs in Allora and his workload has increased since the storm as he juggles putting on new roofs as well as keeping up with other regular work requirements.

“I have done about four or five houses so far and still have about 10 more to do,” Mr Harrison said.

He hopes to have all the hail-associated work finished by December, with each house taking about five days to complete in between other commitments.

Mr Harrison said he remembered a similar situation about 25 years ago where hail caused extensive damage outside of Allora and he had a number of roofs to repair afterwards.

He said houses that suffered only superficial damage were still waiting for roof repairs but were not leaking.

Damage repair to cars which were battered in the storm and went through Wilson and Rigby Motor Body Works have almost been completed.

Owner Peter Morton said he only had two cars left to fix after working through 40 cars since December.

“It’s been busy compared to what you are used to, and with the same staff levels you are doing larger jobs and extra jobs each week,” Mr Morton said.

“As a team we handled the hail damage well; we worked at it though.”

Mr Morton said the majority of cars that came through his workshop were severely damaged by hail and took two weeks to complete.

“We finished the bulk of the work in April, with our first cars coming in early December,” he said.

To prepare the workshop for the hard yards ahead Mr Morton purchased an additional $30,000 worth of machinery, which he said was a great decision.

“It was a natural catastrophe,” Mr Morton said. “No one likes to see houses, cars and windows smashed.”

Even with the increased business, he said it was a painful experience for everybody in the region.

A lot of the cars affected by the hail didn’t make it to a workshop as they were written off due to the extensive damage.



UPDATE: Asbestos forces compound closure

UPDATE: Asbestos forces compound closure

Asbestos discovered at bin compound

Generosity flows from local clubs in Warwick drought appeal

Generosity flows from local clubs in Warwick drought appeal

Local clubs raise thousands to help drought-affected friends.

Broken leg inspires mum to start own creative business

premium_icon Broken leg inspires mum to start own creative business

Falling off a ramp left her bed bound and wondering how to stay busy

Local Partners