DIG IN: Today is National Burger Day.
DIG IN: Today is National Burger Day. Gold Coast Bulletin

How much do you really know about the humble hamburger?

MONDAY, May 28 is National Burger Day and as it approaches it seems only fitting to take a look at the humble burger in its many forms and discover a few things you may not know about this worldwide favourite.

A hamburger or burger is a sandwich consisting of one or more cooked patties of ground meat, usually beef, placed inside a sliced bread roll or bun.

The term hamburger originally derives from Hamburg, Germany's second-largest city. In German, burg means castle, fortified settlement or fortified refuge and is a widespread component of place names.

While the inspiration for the hamburger did come from Hamburg, the sandwich concept was invented much later.

In the 18th century, beef from German Hamburg cows was minced and combined with garlic, onions, salt and pepper, then formed into patties (without bread or a bun) to make Hamburg steaks.

The hamburger most likely first appeared in the 19th or early 20th century, but the exact origin of the hamburger may never be known with any certainty.

The Library of Congress credits Louis Lassen, a Danish immigrant, owner of Louis' Lunch in New Haven, Connecticut as the creator of the hamburger as we know it.

Some historians believe that it was invented by a cook who placed a Hamburg steak between two slices of bread in a small town in Texas, and others credit the founder of White Castle for developing the Hamburger Sandwich.

The hamburger gained national recognition at the 1904 St Louis World's Fair when the New York Tribune referred to the hamburger as "the innovation of a food vendor on the pike”.

Throughout the years hamburgers have become a symbol of American cuisine, though they are loved the world over.

Due to widely anti-German sentiment in the US during World War I, an alternative name for hamburgers was Salisbury steak.

Following the war, hamburgers became unpopular until the White Castle restaurant chain marketed and sold large numbers of small eightsqcm hamburgers, known as sliders.

White Castle is the oldest burger chain in America.

It was started in 1921 by Walter A. Anderson and E.W. Ingram who sold their burgers for 5c a piece.

McDonald's Corporation is the world's largest chain of hamburger fast food restaurants, serving around 68 million customers daily in 119 countries.

McDonald's holds the record of selling more than 300 billion burgers, while worldwide, McDonald's sells 75 hamburgers per second.

The Big Mac was introduced in 1968 and sold for 49 cents.

In 1996, McDonald's attempted to introduce a hamburger called the "Arch Deluxe,” a higher-end burger marketed specifically to adults.

It was soon discontinued after failing to become popular despite a massive marketing campaign and now is considered one of the most expensive flops of all time.

Glamburger is burger that features bits of edible gold leaf, lobster and caviar.

One of the most expensive burgers ever created, it also includes ingredients like black truffle, Kobe beef, venison and a duck egg.

The burger, which was created in 2014 by Honky Tonk restaurant in London, cost £1100, or $1700.

The largest hamburger weighed 913.54kg and was prepared by Black Bear Casino Resort, Carlton, Minnesota, USA, on September 2, 2012.

The hamburger was topped with 23.81kg of tomatoes, 22.68kg of lettuce, 27.22kg of onion, 8.62kg of pickles, 18.14kg of American cheese and 7.48kg of bacon.

Nearly 60 per cent of all sandwiches sold worldwide are actually hamburgers.



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