Police Minister Jo-Ann Miller praised the female inmates' service and rehabilitation efforts.
Police Minister Jo-Ann Miller praised the female inmates' service and rehabilitation efforts. Warren Lynam

Warwick Work Camp inmates aid our region for second chance

Should people found guilty of committing a crime do more community service?

This poll ended on 03 September 2015.

Current Results

Yes

100%

No

0%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

BEHIND the scenes of many community organisations and regional events are women from the Warwick Work Camp, a low-security facility that gives female offenders a second chance.

Twenty years since its inception, the camp program was granted full-time status two years ago and now provides community service to the value of $249,000 to the region each year.

Corrective Services Minister Jo-Ann Miller praised the work camp for the services it provided to the community.

"The program provides regional communities with valuable labour while providing prisoners with an opportunity to make reparation to communities and gain valuable skills," Ms Miller said.

The Warwick women's camp is one of two camps for female prisoners in the state, which inject a total of $3 million of community work into regional Queensland each year.

In the last financial year the camp provided 14,763 hours of community work at sites such as the Warwick Showgrounds and Warwick and District Historical Society Museum.

Warwick Historical Society president Janice Flood said the women from the work camp provided valuable maintenance work at the Pringle Cottage museum precinct.

"We are so reliant on the ladies for their help with keeping the buildings clean and maintenance work," Mrs Flood said.

"Their energy and enthusiasm is great."

Warwick Show and Rodeo Society Treasurer Julia Kruger said the society was just one of the organisations that benefitted from the service.

"They do ongoing grounds maintenance like mowing, and they help at rodeo and show time in the canteen," Mrs Kruger said.

"It teaches them new skills; for instance, they repainted the caretaker's house last year and they were taught how to use a sander to sand back the house.

"They're invaluable - we're truly grateful they're here.

"We would be lost without them."

Southern Downs Mayor Peter Blundell commended the program for its community contribution.

"The women contribute enormously to community groups around the region and provide a wonderful service," Cr Blundell said.

"I think it's been very worthwhile and certainly acknowledge the hard work of the people who run the program in making it so successful."

A Queensland Corrective Services spokesman said women were selected for the program that gives offenders a greater chance of reintegration into the community.

"The women have an opportunity to develop improved self-worth, confidence and valuable skills to support future employment and successful re-integration into the community," he said.



SWEET DELIGHTS: New Somerset business aims to go global

Premium Content SWEET DELIGHTS: New Somerset business aims to go global

Toogoolawah’s newest business plans to take their operation globally

REVEALED: Qld’s COVID vaccine rollout plan

Premium Content REVEALED: Qld’s COVID vaccine rollout plan

Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young has opened up

Frustration as $43m splurge fails to ensure Gap future

Premium Content Frustration as $43m splurge fails to ensure Gap future

‘That’s where I’d like to see the money spent’: Controversy over where this million...