AFTER her son Lachlan was stillborn at 28 weeks, Kirstie Shaw saw first-hand the lack of support for mothers who lost babies.

Shortly after losing Lachlan, the Collingwood Park mum co-founded Precious Wings two years ago with her friend Kerry Gordon who had also experienced stillbirth.

READ MORE: When a baby doesn't cry

"There was no warning, no cause of death was ever found, he would become just another perfect baby lost to the horror of unexplained stillbirth," she said.

"It was a major turning point and pointed me to a new path."

The charity supplies hospitals with memory boxes to give to families whose babies or children die so they have something to remember them by.

READ MORE: Memory boxes help grieving process

"Last year we delivered more than 600 memory boxes and more than 600 miscarriage bags to hospitals in Brisbane, Ipswich, the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast," Ms Shaw said.

"It's an acknowledgement that they've just been through this horrendous traumatic event and it re-enforces the fact that somebody cares."

Precious Wings co-founder Kirstie Shaw (right) explains how the organisation provides special gifts for grieving families at the devastating time when they have lost a baby or child. Pictured with Ipswich Hospital clinical mid-wife Aynsley Hunter.
Precious Wings co-founder Kirstie Shaw (right) explains how the organisation provides special gifts for grieving families at the devastating time when they have lost a baby or child. Pictured with Ipswich Hospital clinical mid-wife Aynsley Hunter. David Nielsen

Ms Shaw said it was shattering for parents to leave hospital with nothing.

"As a parent the hardest thing in the world is walking out of the hospital without your baby. I can't even describe that feeling," she said.

"Every box has the message, 'as you leave the hospital without your precious baby we hope you take peace in the knowledge (they) will be loved and remembered'.

READ MORE: Rainbow after the storm

"The boxes have a candle, a photo frame, obviously tissues are a must and we also include two teddy bears with one usually going with the baby and one being kept by the parents so they can keep that link with their baby."

Ms Shaw said the boxes were donated in memory of another lost child to make sure parents knew they were not alone.

"They can realise someone else has gone through this and they're still here," she said.

"You get this fleeting moment to make a lifetime worth of memories so anything that can enable that process is a good thing."

Visit the Precious Wings Facebook page.



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