Jail for taking drug lab rap

A WOMAN who claimed responsibility for a drug lab out of "misguided loyalty" was caught out when it emerged she had no idea how to assemble the lab or use it.

Bundaberg Supreme Court was also told no fingerprints belonging to Alesha Fay Fleming, 21, could be found on the equipment.

Fleming and several others were in a Fagg St home in March last year when police raided the house and found a clandestine drug lab and a quantity of methylamphetamine, or "speed".

During a police interview, Fleming claimed all responsibility and said she had planned to "make a fortune" from the production of the drugs.

But police questioning proved she had no idea how to even assemble the laboratory, let alone use it to do a cook. "Her prints were not on the laboratory," police prosecutor Greg Cummings told the court.

"She says no one else touched the equipment where, quite obviously, everyone else did."

He said Fleming was charged on the basis she had organised for the cook to take place.

Defence barrister Carl Heaton appeared for Fleming, who he said had been addicted to methylamphetamine since the age of 12 or 13.

He said the 21-year-old, who pleaded guilty to producing and possessing dangerous drugs, had moved to Bundaberg when she was 16 and had fallen in with a crowd of speed users.

Mr Heaton said since being caught, she had moved to Brisbane and quit drugs.

"She went cold turkey from speed," he said.

"She recognised there was more to life than the ... repetitive, meaningless, drug-addicted lifestyle."

Justice Duncan McMeekin told Fleming that by lying about her involvement, she opened herself up to spend half a decade behind bars.

"These statements were false," he said.

"You seemed to have no clue as to how to go about it."

Justice McMeekin sentenced her to 12 months jail with immediate parole release.

"You should know personally that methylamphetamine is a dangerous drug," he told her.

"It destroys lives and it kills people."



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