KAK's bad news may do good

FIRST it was the Kylie effect. Next it could be the Kerri-Anne effect.

Television personality Kerri-Anne Kennerly's announcement that she has breast cancer could boost the number of women seeking breast screening, similar to that which followed Kylie Minogue's breast cancer diagnosis in 2005.

BreastScreen Queensland Sunshine Coast medical director Doctor Deborah Pfeiffer said news of a celebrity with cancer often spurred women into breast screens.

Dr Pfeiffer's observation was supported by Professor John Lowe, head of the school of health and sport sciences at the University of the Sunshine Coast.

"There's a lot of data that says that any time a high profile person, be it man or woman, is diagnosed with cancer, there's an increase in screening rates," Prof Lowe said.

While Ms Minogue's diagnosis was followed by an increase in young women seeking mammograms, Dr Pfeiffer said Ms Kennerly, 58, was in an age group where women should already be having routine two-yearly screenings.

Dr Pfeiffer urged anyone with symptoms of breast cancer to contact their general practitioner fighting breast cancer

75% of breast cancers occur in women over 50 Women aged 40 and over should have their breasts screened every two years.

Breast Screen Queensland has screening services at Gympie, Noosa, Nambour, Maroochydore, Caloundra and Caboolture. Call 13 2050.



Teacher says games are the way to go to help children learn

premium_icon Teacher says games are the way to go to help children learn

She's created a new games kit to help build skills and confidence

HOONS: Drivers caught making dragways of our city streets

premium_icon HOONS: Drivers caught making dragways of our city streets

Dashcam video reveals dangerous driving stint that shocked families

Man on death's door took gutsy step, now healthier than ever

premium_icon Man on death's door took gutsy step, now healthier than ever

At 70, Don Chisholm is the healthiest he's ever been in his life

Local Partners