WOMAN'S WORLD: Mayla Magnani, Isabel Kay, Chealsea Williams, Hannah McMeniman, and Tahlia Karena from Stanthorpe Gremlins U17s play at their semi-finals.
WOMAN'S WORLD: Mayla Magnani, Isabel Kay, Chealsea Williams, Hannah McMeniman, and Tahlia Karena from Stanthorpe Gremlins U17s play at their semi-finals. Tessa Flemming

Kicking through a glass ceiling: the girls who love league

UPON first impression, league doesn't seem like the type of sport that would attract many girls, but one team is showing everyone they're not playing around when it comes to semi-finals.

Playing at the junior rugby league semi-finals today, the U17s Stanthorpe Gremlins were only formed four years ago, but in that short time they've already doubled the size of their team and worked their way up to the second last round of this season's match, not to mention their work tackling stereotypes.

Player Tahlia Karena, who watched her dad play footy her whole life, didn't really think it was the type of sport for her until she gave it a go.

"I wasn't keen on league when I started, but it's a lot different to how I envisioned” she said.

"I view the team as a family and the game as our baby and we always want to win back the baby.”

For Tahlia, not only did the sport bring her closer to her teammates, but she also found it was a great way for them to let go.

"Being an angry person, it's great to let your frustrations out on the field,” she said.

"There's one girl, Mayla, who's super cute, but as soon as she's out on the field, she's just a menace. No one can catch her.”

Despite the sport being tag, Tahlia was quick to tell naysayers just how hardcore it could get in the heat of competition.

"We had one girl wrapped around another girl's chin one time, and we get lots of concussions considering we're tag,” she said.

Into the future, Tahlia hoped the team could continue to challenge the perception of the game and introduce tackling, getting everyone to finally pay attention to a team kicking ass and goals.

"We are very competitive and like to show our dominance,” she said.

"We always watch the boys, so it's their turn to watch us.

"It's a woman's world after all.”



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