Glennie Heights Grade 3/4 class learn about money with the Commonwealth Foundation StartSmart.
Glennie Heights Grade 3/4 class learn about money with the Commonwealth Foundation StartSmart. Lisa Hemmings

Kids get smart with cash

FINANCIAL fitness is something that even adults struggle with.

On Monday Glennie Heights State School students were put through their financial paces by Coach Cash, AKA Jessica Mead.

Miss Mead is a StartSmart Primary facilitator who travels across Queensland visiting schools with an interactive money management workshop.

"We have designed StartSmart Primary specifically for younger students and so our sessions are fun, interactive, and exciting," she said.

The lessons teach the value of money to students, where money comes from and how to save.

"The kids are actually picking up key lessons and values about money, which are important life-long skills," Miss Mead said.

Coach Cash went through budgeting, how to read receipts, understanding bank statements, saving tips, and online shopping traps.

"We also teach the children the value of money," she said.

"Money does not grow on trees, or a bottomless credit card. We go through how a credit card works, so that the young kids understand."

Trent Moy, Commonwealth Bank general manager community, said the foundation was committed to developing financial literacy skills to create long-term benefits for all Australians.

"StartSmart Primary will deliver over 5500 workshops and will help teach more than 140,000 primary students fundamental money management skills this year alone," he said.



Pig and Calf: 'It takes them away from isolation'

Pig and Calf: 'It takes them away from isolation'

Social skills often taken for granted are learnt at the saleyards

Warwick could be at risk of losing historic institution

premium_icon Warwick could be at risk of losing historic institution

It's one of the oldest in the state but that claim is under threat

Buskers call for more freedom to make music on our streets

premium_icon Buskers call for more freedom to make music on our streets

Public performances being stifled by 'unreasonable' laws

Local Partners