Warwick East students (from left) Nicolas Williams, Kyle Piovesan, James Walker and Angus McKay prepare for the three legged race, as other students generations before them did decades ago.
Warwick East students (from left) Nicolas Williams, Kyle Piovesan, James Walker and Angus McKay prepare for the three legged race, as other students generations before them did decades ago. Emma Channon

Leg it on down to the park

CARRIAGE rides, musical performances, wine tasting, whip-plaiting demonstrations, three-legged races and other old-time events, 60 market stalls and a shearing demonstration.

This will all be among the attractions to squeeze into Leslie Park for the finale of Warwick’s 150th birthday.

The week-long celebrations will end with a bang tomorrow, with six hours of entertainment and activities from 10am.

A mixture of bands, poets, duos and soloists – including the City Band and Heritage Highlanders – will take to the rotunda to provide an entertaining backdrop.

One of dozens of performers, indigenous artist Terry Olsen (from the Alldridge clan), will be host three workshops for the public.

The former Slade School student will teach the basics of Aboriginal dances at noon, 1pm and 2pm and will invite the participants to join him on stage for the finale at 4pm.

“The dances come from far north Queensland and I will teach them the basic movement,” he said. “It’s dance and movement – as long as they pose at the end of it, that’s the most important. When the music stops, you do too.”

Warwick’s past and present will meet at the park, with a range of demonstrations illustrating life in the Rose City 150 years ago.

A&K Carriage rides will whisk people around the block all day, while Mick Bradford will demonstrate the power of horses with machinery.

For children, there will be face painting, clowns, stilt walkers, Feel Good fitness classes and games with the Young Ambassadors.

Among the community stalls will be sponsor Warwick Credit Union, an Apex-run jumping castle, a Red Cross collection point and healthy cooking demonstrations.

Warwick Tourism and Events CEO Tracy Vellacott said the party would be a big finale to the milestone.

“What I’ve loved about the whole celebration is the great community vibe – there’s a real buzz out there and I think people have been genuinely glad to be a part of it,” she said.

“For me, I don’t have that giant sense of family history others might, but perhaps there’s more of an interest for me in finding a bit more about my own family.”

For those who’d like a souvenir of 150th celebrations, visit the merchandise stall.



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