CHAPTERS IN HISTORY: Bill and Nancy Gross have collected over 5000 clippings of the Daily News for 50 years.
CHAPTERS IN HISTORY: Bill and Nancy Gross have collected over 5000 clippings of the Daily News for 50 years.

Loyal WDN readers collect 5000 clippings over 50 years

FROM top prize prime cattle at the Warwick Show to Christmas light competition wins, the Gross family history lies within old copies of the Daily News, diligently clipped out and tucked away for safekeeping.

For as long as Bill and Nancy Gross can remember, a copy of the paper would arrive at the end of their drive way each morning, ready to be devoured over breakfast.

And every time Bill or their children and later grand children made an appearance, Nancy added their stories to her collection.

“I’d have about 5,000 (clippings) all my ten grandkids are in sport, basket ball volleyball and cricket,” Mrs Gross said.

“Every time someone did something in the paper I’ve got clips of it, books and books and books of cuttings.”

Born and bred in Warwick, Mr Gross started reading the Daily News when he was 15.

“I’m 81 now, 60 years I’ve been reading the paper.”

Bill and Nancy Gross with just some of their large collection of Daily News clippings.
Bill and Nancy Gross with just some of their large collection of Daily News clippings.

A prime cattle champion, Mr Gross said it was a personal tradition appearing in it at show time each year.

Mr Gross said he’ll never forget the first time he was in the paper, in 1962 when he took out the prime cattle hook and hoof at the Warwick Show.

“It was thrilling, the thrill of my life,” he said.

Thousands of clippings cover the couple’s kitchen table.
Thousands of clippings cover the couple’s kitchen table.

“I still get a bit of a kick out of it.”

Mrs Gross was no stranger to being featured in the paper either, featured for her cooking, work at the sale yards and four years in a row of Christmas light competition wins.

“I haven’t been in it nearly as much as Bill though,” she said.

When the couple first moved into their Warwick home, they found a copy of the paper from 1915, underneath the floor lining.

The couple’s photos of their grandson Lachlan as a child and adult in the paper.
The couple’s photos of their grandson Lachlan as a child and adult in the paper.

“I’ve even got that somewhere in one of my boxes, the back room is full.”

As the appear heads toward it’s final copy, Mrs Gross recalls when she first began reading the Daily News as a teenager growing up in Elbow Valley.

“You’d read the front cover to the back, it was something to read, you didn’t have access to the Courier Mail or anything like that, all you had was the Daily News,“ she said.

“It’s a gateway to the community, the lifeblood of Warwick it’s the first thin you think of, what’s in the paper,” she said.

“We’d be lost without it, it’s part of our whole life.”

The paper will live on in its digital edition but Mr and Mrs Gross said they’ll be buying multiple copies of the final print edition, something they’ll cherish forever.

“We’ll probably buy 100 copies, it’ll be part of history I think they’d sell millions.”



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