TAKE TIME: Biloela based mindset and emotions coach Leon Christiansen urges men to prioritise their health above others.
TAKE TIME: Biloela based mindset and emotions coach Leon Christiansen urges men to prioritise their health above others.

Managing men’s health before it’s too late

ALCOHOLISM, drug use and suicide are just some of the consequences men can suffer if they don't put more time in to manage their health.

This week is Men's Health Week (June 15-21) across Australia and health professionals are putting the onus on men across the country to put time into caring for their bodies and minds.

Biloela based mindset and emotions coach Leon Christiansen said the reason there was such a big issue around men's health was that they hadn't been taught to or allowed to express their emotions.

"The stuff I hear every day is 'I shouldn't have any problems' or 'I shouldn't speak up because someone is always worse off'," Mr Christiansen said.

"So many people think their problem isn't worthy enough.

"Everyone has different issues and they need to be addressed, whatever we suppress we are resisting and we are making it a potential problem that will come out in another way like anger, drug use and excessive alcohol consumption."

Mr Christinasen said that Men's Health Week was good to build awareness but men better managing their heath should be a year round practice.

"If we aren't filling our cup and doing the things that make us feel good, how can we help others, serve and be good for our family?" Mr Christiansen said.

"A lot of people I work with and have grown up with put themselves last and put everyone else first.

"The analogy I use is, everyone's been on a plane and they say whose oxygen mask do you put on first, yours, you can't help anyone if you're dead."

2018 data by the ABS found that the rate of suicide among males is more than three times greater than that of females.

This Men's Health Week Mates4Mates is encouraging men to prioritise exercise to help improve their mental health and build resilience.

Research shows men who are inactive are 60 per cent more likely to suffer from depression than those who are active.

Mates4Mates psychologist Chris McIntyre said one in eight men would experience depression in their lifetime, but strategies, such as regular exercise, could help reduce the impact of mental illness.

"While there are many complexities surrounding the causes of mental illness, exercise can play an important role in both preventing some cases, and helping to manage symptoms for those impacted," Mr McIntyre said.

"Even 30 minutes of moderate physical activity a day can improve your mood and energy levels, enable you to sleep better and become more focused.

"You can also use online services as a cost-effective way to exercise.

"YouTube has many workouts and resources developed by fitness experts."

For more information and to access support, visit mates4mates.org or phone 1300 4 MATES.



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