A two-metre goanna staying out of trouble up in the tree.
A two-metre goanna staying out of trouble up in the tree. Janet Platz

Massive tree-climbing goanna captured by keen photographer

WHEN JANET Platz was growing up her father always had a camera swinging at his hip and it's a habit that proved contagious.

Mrs Platz now rarely goes anywhere without her trusty Nikon D750 in tow, allowing her to capture incredible scenes from around her stunning 12ha hobby farm at Mount Tabor as well as on international shores.

At first she enjoyed capturing images of her children and scenery but a trip to Africa in 2010 shifted her focus to wildlife.

"They're unique, there's nowhere else in the world you can get those animals," she said.

"We had cheetahs close by and you can see 100 documentaries and it's nothing like seeing it in real life, there's such diversity."

Back at home she has captured incredible images of a massive two-metre lace goanna climbing a tree at her property, which she believes was a returning visitor she first spotted in January last year.

"There's a wildlife corridor of trees that runs down north to south (on the property)," Mrs Platz said.

"The birds give it (the goanna) away, but you have to see if it's a snake first."

 

A two-metre goanna staying out of trouble up in the tree.
A two-metre goanna staying out of trouble up in the tree. Janet Platz

It was the biggest goanna she'd seen, as she said the species was the second largest on the east coast of Australia.

She also takes pictures of the plethora of birds that visit the area, including brown honeyeaters and wrens.

Mrs Platz, who is also a volunteer at the Warwick Visitor Information Centre, said capturing and sharing the images also benefited tourism.

"It's all about enticing people to our area," she said.

We are lucky to have many talented photographers taking pictures around the region, she said.

"Look what we have to photograph in this area, we can go from wildlife to sunflowers," Mrs Platz said.

 

A photo of bath time with one wren keeping watch, one wet bedraggled wren and one unhappy wren with the arrival of a brown honeyeater.
A photo of bath time with one wren keeping watch, one wet bedraggled wren and one unhappy wren with the arrival of a brown honeyeater. Janet Platz

Mrs Platz carries out limited editing on her photos but had a few tips to share.

She always takes notice of the background of photos, especially when snapping animals.

She also tends to take pictures in a wider frame and then crops them in, depending on the size that's needed.

 

As a steward at the photographic section of the Warwick Show, Mrs Platz said she had also learnt a lot about her craft from viewing the entries.

"It's encouraging to see juniors to come through and try their hand," she said.

"Let's get it out there and encourage people to have a go."

Now Mrs Platz's own daughter and grandson have started picking up an eagerness for photography, continuing the legacy her father started in her own childhood.

 

Morning rays sneaking through behind the cloud cover.
Morning rays sneaking through behind the cloud cover. Janet Platz


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