Clare McHugh Von Stieglitz, manager Sheeley Reynolds, Dr Satish Kharia, June Hippi, registered nurse Virginia Cavanagh, Charlie Rowe and CEO Dr Harry Randhawa (front).
Clare McHugh Von Stieglitz, manager Sheeley Reynolds, Dr Satish Kharia, June Hippi, registered nurse Virginia Cavanagh, Charlie Rowe and CEO Dr Harry Randhawa (front). Kirstin Payne

Mobile health unit rolls into Warwick

A BRIGHT new medical facility has landed in Warwick as part of a joint initiative between the Carbal Indigenous Medical Centre and the University of Queensland.

The mobile medical centre will act as a first point health care access facility for the indigenous community of Warwick.

According to Carbal Health centre CEO Dr Harry Randhawa the idea for the health unit was formed because of a need for more indigenous specific clinics in Warwick.

"It was an access issue and the lack of bulk billing in the area," he said.

"After 18 months of feed- back the subject dominated the conversation."

Eighteen months in the making, the scheme was devised in consultation with local health providers and is funded by the Carbal Medical Centre which is based in Toowoomba.

The colourful van comes equipped with two consult rooms and a waiting area to be utilised by a variety of health workers including a nurse, a doctor and a community health worker.

"We can provide culturally appropriate conditions in an environment safe to talk about culturally specific issues with a focus on a preventative approach," Dr Randhawa said.

"Hopefully this will encourage the community to seek medical advice before things get serious."

The clinic is open three days a week and is on the corner of Fitzroy and Guy Sts.

As a trial facility, the scheme is yet to be given an end date.

"We hear there is a need but the proof is in the pudding," the doctor affirmed.

Indigenous community member and former health worker Ranald McIntosh said the opening of the mobile centre was a good step for Warwick.

"It's a strong and positive initiative for the Aboriginal communities of Warwick," Mr McIntosh said.

"I encourage people to access such a good service that's available".

Mr McIntosh expected the health unit to be a huge success.

"The numbers will speak for themselves," he said.

The unit is open to all members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

WHERE: The corner of Fitzroy and Guy Sts.

WHEN: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 9.30-3.30pm

To book an appointment call the medical van on: 0419 139 278.



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