FOR THE FUTURE: Tim and Michelle Coelli from Twisted Gum with their trusty dog Gus.
FOR THE FUTURE: Tim and Michelle Coelli from Twisted Gum with their trusty dog Gus. Liana Walker

No insecticides part of winery's push for sustainability

THERE is no doubt when it comes to the Granite Belt, we are spoilt by beautiful nature and landscape.

The region's unique surroundings and a passion for the environment is at the forefront of why Twisted Gum winery owners Tim and Michelle Coelli are passionate about sustainability.

Mr Coeilli explained the name Twisted Gum comes the mountain orange gum trees which surround the estate, identified by the way their orange bark and the roots which twist around each other.

"These trees only grow between Stanthorpe and Armidale and they grow in poor quality soil like the granite soils we have,” Mr Coelli said.

"We were kind of inspired by the beauty of them when we arrived here. "But it also explains our connection to the bush and to the environment and what we do.”

Mrs Coelli said bushland played a big part in the winery's mission.

"To be sustainable you really need to not have a big monoculture,” she said.

"Our vineyards are all very small and surrounded by local bush. We really don't have a monoculture type of environment here, it's very diverse.”

Mr Coelli added by not having a large monoculture it means they don't need to use insecticides.

"A lot of modern or industrial farming involves massive areas and because of that the nearest trees and bushes are often kilometres away,” he explained.

"If a pest becomes established, caterpillars for examples, there's no predators because the birds don't like being out there and exposed in a big open flat area, they like the protection of the trees.

"That's the advantage of having a smaller blocks is the birds are there and quiet close, so we don't have to use insecticide.”

Mrs Coelli said the biodiversity was an important part of having the bushland and the vineyard.



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