Warwick East State School student Angus McKay won’t be able to play on the monkey bars for a little while yet.
Warwick East State School student Angus McKay won’t be able to play on the monkey bars for a little while yet. Erin Smith

No school yet for these students

SCHOOL is still out for Warwick East State School students, with their oval still hidden beneath the swollen Condamine River yesterday afternoon.

Principal Warren Elder was surrounded by a band of volunteers and staff yesterday, all of whom had rolled up their sleeves to get the school back into pristine condition.

And it is no easy feat.

While staff members were able to salvage most of the school property, inches of mud and water has had to be cleaned from the buildings and grounds and power and phones are yet to be restored.

Fortunately this flood was less destructive than the two that hit the historic school in 2010 and 2011.

Mr Elder said he could not believe he had faced yet another destructive flood.

"When we talk about floods we hear 'one in 30 years or one in 100 years' but this is the third time we have had to deal with it in two years," he said.

"I was absolutely flabbergasted that this happened again because I had been tracking the heights and everything was saying it was going to be minor.

"But when we first came in on Sunday night I realised it was coming and we had to get (everything) out," he said.

Having been through the drill a few times before, the team sprung into action to save their school.

"It is quite devastating but it isn't as bad as before because we were better prepared and had a plan of what we had to move," Mr Elder said.

"The stuff we are throwing away is one 20th of what we threw out last time," he said.

It is hoped the school will re-open its gates on Friday morning and Mr Elder said everything possible was being done to hasten the start of the school year.

"We were mentally prepared to start on Tuesday and suddenly all the plans and preparations have been abandoned," he said.

"I know it is disappointing for parents too and it throws all their plans out the window but I think they will understand because they have seen the water.

"We are loath for our kids to miss school and we are flying to try to minimise that and get them in here."



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