Anders Behring Breivik makes a Nazi salute at the appeal case in Borgarting Court of Appeal at Telemark prison in Skien, Norway.
Anders Behring Breivik makes a Nazi salute at the appeal case in Borgarting Court of Appeal at Telemark prison in Skien, Norway. LISE AASERUD

Norway's killer of 77 gives court a Nazi salute

MASS killer Anders Breivik has performed a Nazi salute in a court that will rule on whether his rights have been violated by keeping him in isolation in prison.

Norway's government is trying to overturn a court verdict that it has violated the killer's rights.

Breivik murdered 77 people in a bomb and shooting rampage in 2011 and has shown no remorse.

He stared briefly at reporters while making the salute but didn't speak.

Judge Oystein Hermansen asked him not to repeat the salute because it insulted the dignity of the court.

The 37-year-old right-wing extremist's isolation is in a three-room cell complex where he can watch TV, play video games and exercise.

He has complained about the quality of the food, having to eat with plastic utensils and not being able to communicate with sympathisers.

Last year, he sued the government, arguing solitary confinement, frequent strip searches and the fact he was often handcuffed during the early part of his jailing had violated his human rights.

Breivik has said his main motive for the murders was to market his manifesto against feminism, Islam and Marxism.

During his sentencing, he apologised "to all militant nationalists in Norway and in Europe for not having killed more people”.

In a decision in April, the Oslo District Court found Breivik's isolation breached the European Convention on Human Rights. It also ordered the government to pay his legal costs of $52,000.

Breivik is serving a 21-year sentence, but that can be extended for as long as he is deemed dangerous to society.



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