Clive Cust thinks men shouldn’t worry about social stigmas like earning more than women or crying in public.
Clive Cust thinks men shouldn’t worry about social stigmas like earning more than women or crying in public. Emma Channon

Our blokes okay with new attitudes

WHEN results from a survey hit our desks about men’s attitudes to social issues, we couldn’t wait to hit the streets to see how the average Warwick bloke compared.

The survey by AskMen research, asked 70,000 men questions about lifestyle, dating and what it meant to be a man in this day and age.

A vast majority (94%) said it was fine for men to cry and 93% didn’t mind if their partners earned more than them.

We beelined to Car Line Mufflers first where we could be sure to find some testosterone and ran into Cliff Cust.

The former policeman and air force man said his experiences had taught him to be open with emotions and said the “macho thing” was dead in the water.

“The problem with guys is we do tend to bottle it up,” he said.

“I think it is okay to cry – when I went to a fatal accident (as a policeman), it’s a big thing to deal with. It’s healthy to be open about it.”

Mr Cust said it was just as acceptable for a woman to earn more than her partner.

“It’d be nice if they did,” he said.

“I grew up where females couldn’t earn the same pay-packet for the same jobs. When they got married they had to leave the workforce and couldn’t do certain jobs.

“Now it’s all equal.”

Leaving the affable car technician, we ran into Alexander Manfield along Albion St, who was happy to share his thoughts.

“I do think there’s a lot of expectation on men about what emotions they can show but I don’t let it worry me,” he said.

Alexander’s mate admits he doesn’t know exactly what constitutes a real man.

“Cars or bikes, I think,” he said.

Walking into a certain Palmerin St electronics shop, two blokes told us society views had transformed.

“It’s more acceptable to show emotions but it’s still not as open as it could be,” one man in his mid-20s explained.

“I might feel more comfortable if I was crying in front of a woman instead of another man.”

And what did he think about salaries? Would he be satisfied if a partner was earning more than him?

“Definitely – maybe I should find myself an old rich bird and move in with her. Become a toy boy,” he said smiling.

His colleague, who was a bit more diplomatic, said the definition of a “real man” changed with one to the next.

“One man is different to the next – some will shed a tear in public and some won’t,” he said.

“I don’t like to stereotype.”

The open-minded man was just as flexible with pay packets, saying gender shouldn’t influence it.



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