LOW vaccination rates are a big turn-off for Queensland parents selecting schools for their five-year-olds, with government data showing as many as two children per class are unprotected.

Almost one in three Queensland parents say that they would not send their child to a "perfect" school with a poor jab rate.

Areas with the highest number of five-year-olds not vaccinated. Source: AIHW
Areas with the highest number of five-year-olds not vaccinated. Source: AIHW

An analysis of Australian Institute of Health and Welfare data shows that South Brisbane has the lowest vaccination rate for five-year-olds in the city, at 93.4 per cent, leaving one in every 15 children not immunised - an average of two per classroom.

The Gold Coast has the lowest immunisation rate for five-year-olds across the state at 92.2 per cent.

The AIHW numbers were crunched by finder.com.au, who also surveyed more than 2000 parents of primary-aged children about their ­biggest deterrents when it comes to school selection.

The fear of dangerous, contagious disease raised a red flag for 28 per cent. This was more of a concern for mothers than fathers.

The National Immunisation Program Schedule in Australia provides free vaccinations for many preventable diseases for children under 10.

"Alongside vaccination rates, things such as academic performance, distance from home and canteen ­hygiene are also influencers," Bessie Hassan from finder.com.au said.

More than half of Queenslanders were put off by high school fees; the distance from home was important to 49 per cent; one-third didn't want a low socio-economic location; and 29 per cent felt academic performance was a priority. The cost of activities and uniforms were also a consideration.

 

The Gold Coast’s Haley Hughes is weighing up which school will best suit her son Harry. Picture: Nigel Hallett
The Gold Coast’s Haley Hughes is weighing up which school will best suit her son Harry. Picture: Nigel Hallett

 

Haley Hughes lives on the Gold Coast, where vaccination rates are low. She is carefully considering the best school for her son Harry who is still in kindy.

"The most important thing for me is individual learning where all kinds of natural ­talents are encouraged. A strong anti-bullying policy is also a priority," she said.



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